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DRIFTING SUN

Neo-Prog • Multi-National


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Drifting Sun biography
DRIFTING SUN were formed sometime during early-90's (originally named Drama), after French natives Pat Sanders (keyboards) and Manu Sibona (bass) left their homecountry and landed in the UK. There they met American singer Rafe Pomeroy and four pieces were recorded in a London-based studio, then sent to Musea for evaluation. The French label decided to sign the band on their branch-label Brennus and in 1996 the self-titled debut of the band sees the light with Karl Groom participating on one track.

Drifting Sun decided to move on as an independent group, the line-up was expanded with the addition of Tobin Bryant and Bryant's friend, guitarist John Spearman, while Pomerey was replaced by another American vocalist, Chris Martini.By the end of the year 1998 the band had launched the sophomore effort "On the Rebound".

What followed was a very long break, but recently Sanders gave his band another chance, gathering a new line-up with singer Peter Falconer, drummer Will Jones and bassist/guitarist Dan Storey. The third work of DRIFTING SUN "Trip the Life Fantastic" was released in early 2015, a digital album, available via several online digital stores.

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Safe AsylumSafe Asylum
Limited Edition · Import
Drifting Sun
Audio CD$19.99
Trip The Life FantasticTrip The Life Fantastic
Import
Drifting Sun
Audio CD$19.99
$13.99 (used)
On the ReboundOn the Rebound
Import
Imports 2016
Audio CD$10.49
$10.48 (used)
TwilightTwilight
Import
Imports 2017
Audio CD$20.74
Trip the Light FantasticTrip the Light Fantastic
Import
Imports 2016
Audio CD$10.49
$10.48 (used)
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DRIFTING SUN discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

DRIFTING SUN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.32 | 19 ratings
Drifting Sun
1996
3.99 | 34 ratings
On The Rebound
1999
3.85 | 134 ratings
Trip The Life Fantastic
2015
3.89 | 115 ratings
Safe Asylum
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
Twilight
2017

DRIFTING SUN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

DRIFTING SUN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

DRIFTING SUN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 4 ratings
From the Vault: Demos & Drafts
2015

DRIFTING SUN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.50 | 4 ratings
Piano Works
2015
4.29 | 7 ratings
Lady Night
2015
4.40 | 5 ratings
Alice
2015
4.00 | 2 ratings
The Hidden Truth
2016
4.00 | 2 ratings
A Year In Black
2016
3.00 | 2 ratings
Eternal Cycle
2017

DRIFTING SUN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 On The Rebound by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.99 | 34 ratings

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On The Rebound
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

4 stars Drifting Sun's latest opus "Asylum" was a shockingly delirious surprise, certainly taking my ears by storm and rendering them gaga, as my drippy review clearly denounced. Easily one of the 'Grand Crus' of 2016 and a perennial future mainstay in my rotation. Keyboardist and leader Pat Sanders decided to seize on all the hoopla to remaster and release their 1998 opus "On the Rebound", invigorating it with sharper production and wider sonic depth. Obviously 18 years have passed, so the quality of the song writing must (and does) stand the test of time, with the added benefit of a fresh coat of sonic paint and modern veneer. Evidently , the material here is first rate and should have been better received but alas, was not!

"The Charade" spans 13 minutes and is spearheaded by an eloquent piano ride, demonstrating that Pat is a highly gifted keyboardist , ably supported by a muscular guitarist in John Spearman , a wild Fishy vocalist in American Chris Martini as well as a tough drummer in Tobin Bryant. Pat's long ?time associate and French compatriot Manu Sibona handles the low end with overt influence and power. This is primo neo-prog of the finest vintage, as tasty if not more so than all the usual suspects (IQ, Pendragon, Pallas, Marillion etc?), expertly delivered, passionately rendered and seared by some strong dramatics.

The heavier disposed "Swan Song" packs quite a punch, as the piece is organ boosted and guitar molested, playfully symphonic (those celestial harpsichord patches I adore) when needed , rock 'n roll when push comes to shove , Spearman peeling off a few frenzied twisters on the fret board, as the rhythm section thunders onward. Martini sings perfectly, no hint of a Yankee accent, actually incorporating some shrieking tendencies that would easily grace a metal album, the man can screech! Ebb and flow, gentle and serene one moment and then explosive the next, no boring 'walk in the park' affliction here.

"Drifting Sun" is the name of the band and the title of the track, anthemic at first, a 'paradise of the soul', Martini doing a great moaning job on the microphone, a very difficult task not to sound kitsch, so kudos to you, man! Again the piano is the dominating force here, which is why this band rises above the rest, I have noticed that high quality neo is really dependent on a gifted ivory tickler. The energetic vocal inflections are constantly on the edge, a pleasant surprise and a constant guarantor of avid audience acquiescence. Thrilling, pulpy, juicy and abundant, this is top-notch material, not really accessible as there is a lot of dizzying instrumental gyrations, keeping the sonic sword skilfully honed.

The sun has gone down for a brief rest and the "Long Nights" has graced the stage, another extended piece that proposes nocturnal fantasies in a mistier setting, pervading fog rolling over the pavement, spooky shadows and eerie mutterings, 'too much confusion' wails the trembling Martini, as the mood continues its Halloween waltz. There is almost a British-tinged Ange groove here, theatrics drenched in schizophrenia, where demented vocals, a lilting cemetery beat and a sense of unease suffuses and infiltrates the curious mind. The instrumental adornments are all unbelievably adept and creative, Spearman's lunacy-ridden solo as prime example! I mean wow! Stunning track.

Spiraling aimlessly into the cosmos after such a catapult of sound and emotion, the Drifting Sun spaceship reaches "Heaven's Eyes", a shorter ballad of exquisite polish and reflection, again adorned by grandiose piano manipulations that exalt beauty, as paralleled by Martini's anguished vocals. Precious and then ferocious, the passion plays out fully. Beautiful, just plain beautiful. Tears can easily emanate from those eyes!

Two 10 minute slices finish off this entertaining disc, the first , "Minstrel" reverts immediately to proggier realms, an opening of oddly echoing choir work setting the tone for a rather conspicuously diverse piece, the bass guitar rampaging with impunity, obese and obedient, dragging the pace as well as the others. The arrangement engages a new direction at will, the ornate piano being again the motivator for change and altered direction. Martini is hysteric, higher-pitched and melodramatically inclined, just to keep things boiling. The electric guitar squeals when prompted but well within certain linear perspectives. A medieval-tinged outro does wonders for the soul, as the wind blows mercilessly and the bell tolls.

Throw away that mask, show your real face will you? Identify yourself, sire! Very well, scoundrels! "Mon Masque" has fallen to the ground, revealing a bruising bass that sets up a groove that veers in all directions, extremely contorted and luxuriant. Then a few French words just to upset the cart and further confuse, glittering prize of robust rumble, eerie organ flutters and clanging guitars. Again a slight Ange feel that is utterly delightful. The axe solo is stalked by a synth foray, nothing overly complex but definitely agitated and nervy. As per "Safe Asylum", the piano is the major highlight, don't get me wrong, all the other players are exquisite in their own right but the emotional impact of that mythical instrument is prominently displayed on all tracks and acts as a definite reference point. Great slice of their career and meritorious of further investigation and ultimate purchase.

4.5 slippery orbs

 On The Rebound by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.99 | 34 ratings

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On The Rebound
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Drifting Sun made a great little comeback lately, but On the Rebound shows that they were no slouches before their 16 year hiatus. When you see a neo-prog album whose title comes from the opening line of Cinderella search, you're inclined to expect a straight-up clone of Marillion's 1980s style. Far from that, Drifting Sun offer something much more interesting - a piece which makes me think of what Marillion might have sounded like in the mid-1990s had they not broadened their sound with a range of influences from outside neo-prog once Steve Hogarth came in but instead kept their old style advancing and developing. Worth a second look, now that the band are back in force.
 Safe Asylum by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 115 ratings

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Safe Asylum
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Bands playing neo-prog inspired by the 1980s work of Marillion, Pendragon and IQ aren't exactly thin on the ground, but Drifting Sun stand out of the crowd on Safe Asylum with how capably they are able to produce beautiful moments comparable to the most emotive heights that their neo-prog inspirations could evoke at their prime. Guitarist Dan Storey in particular deserves praise for adding a darker and harder-edged tone to proceedings which helps Drifting Sun carve out a distinctive musical sphere for themselves, whilst Pat Sanders deserves to sit next to Mark Kelly and Clive Nolan in the pantheon of neo-prog keyboardists.
 Safe Asylum by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 115 ratings

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Safe Asylum
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by tszirmay
Special Collaborator Crossover Team

5 stars Drifting Sun is one of those bands that have come up on my radar recently, intrigued by some of the reviews that speak very highly of their quality neo-prog as well as the rather interesting history. Keyboardist Patrick Sanders is actually a French national who, along with bassist Manu Sibona tried creating a band called Drama in his home country but that name was already taken by Eric Azhar and his mates. Pat then went to Canada (Quebec for a while) and then established himself in the UK, founding Drifting Sun in 1996, surrounding himself with top notch local British musicians. "Safe Asylum" is their fourth release and it's a real jewel, taking into account that for neo-prog to be brilliant, it requires fabulous instrumental prowess, a concise vision and stylistic delivery. These pro players are a well-rounded team, led by Sanders' arsenal of keyboards, guitarist Dan Storey has both grit and fluency in his sharp technique, drummer Will Jones provides a rock solid foundational rhythm to the arrangements, while vocalist Peter Falconer owns an immediately attractive set of vocal chords. I am not familiar with their previous releases but if "Safe Asylum" is any kind of barometer then I look forward to having all their highly rated prior albums in my collection.

A stirring 8 minute+ piece kicks off the proceedings, "King of Hearts" is the owner of sensational contrasts, a suave universe where soft melodic passages that exude charm coalesce with powerful surges, a myriad of rhythmic alterations, chock full of bombastic keyboard swerves and a fab vocalist who strangely reminds me of Lou Gramm of Foreigner fame, a unswerving compliment if I may say! What a way to kick off an album, exciting, frenzied, slick and bluesy emotions are all there to stun into silence!

"The Hidden Truth" keeps the delicate sound of their thunder blasting along, this time a lot smoother groove with choppy, almost jazzy rhythmic pulses and a delectable melody, sung to utter perfection by Falconer. Storey peels off an intricate and extended axe solo, laden with emotive gulp, a slowly built sizzle that bites the melodic hand that feeds it, blending in acoustic guitar when needed, all the while helped along by the sublime synths and ornate piano. Drummer Jones is in the spotlight with his deft wrists doing some nifty tricks.

The longest track here , the dreamy "Intruder " clocks in over 10 minutes and is definitely a highlight track, showcasing all the accumulated strengths that exude from these rather stellar craftsmen, a particular attention to a shrieking vocal that will 'shiver me timbers", sincerely frightening and deliverer of goose bump emotions. The keyboard and guitar interplay are reminiscent of the legendary Mick Rogers-Manfred Mann duo, hitting notes like two power tennis sluggers, smashing, lobbing, volleying and acing like no other. The ominous lyrical content is equally interesting, dealing with sombre subject matter, submerged in dark and moody atmospheres, like some distant hurricane waiting to destroy.

A moment of respite is needed after all that urgent experience, the delicate "Alice" is initially led by piano and voice. And what a voice! Peter Falconer hits a higher register than previously thought, a bucolic ballad in a very English style, about some 'pretty girl', all innocence and desire, fueled by a gorgeous, violin-led orchestral passage that has a Beatles-like hue that cannot be ignored. Absolutely spellbinding! Four tracks in and you can already tell this will be a masterpiece! And of course, if there is an "Alice", there must be a "Wonderland" not too far away and the 8 minute segue fits perfectly into their creative development, a darker universe of more complex symphonics, a measured pace with a huskier voice from this fabulously talented vocalist! A dreamy piano sequence is then followed by a harder guitar rampage, a slick organ in tow as the rhythmic section heightens the propulsion with a surging vocal that pants and emotes like no other. Pat then twirls and dances with his guitar partner, who blitzes with the best, lightning fast and hyper bluesy. Bold, insistent, confident, sizzling and proud, this is truly another sublime track on a truly remarkable release.

The yearning towards the divine comes across on the appropriately named "Gods", proprietor of a ridiculously perfect melody, celestial chorus and that eternal contrast between soft and hard, as if defining the links between Heaven and Hell, gloriously majestic and enchanting. Once again, Falconer's pipes really do wonders, a modern-day Hercules of the microphone.

Back to darker expanses with the stark "Desolation" and its companion piece "Retribution", perfectly highlighting the unique methodology of doubling up songs in pairs, paralleling their sonic palette philosophy as well as the obvious symbiosis between soloists. 'Close your eyes' Peter intones in a broken monotone (the man can sing, bellow, wail, whisper and shout). Will Jones does his best Chris Slade imitation (another compliment), pummeling his skins with apparent ease and effect. A torrid fretboard solo ensues, shoved along by a pugnacious bass, slithering synth and driving organ. Delirium! I really cannot help seeing the comparison to a modern and proggier version of Manfred Mann's Earth Band, circa "Bombers & Nightingales". That is another compliment of the highest standard!

The super short guitar solo is just pure "Emphasis", a lovely wink and nod. This tremendous disc is finished up with a gorgeous piano-driven instrumental piece "Vagabond", Pat firmly in the thin beam of the spotlight, his synths not far behind, while Dan Storey introduces his thrilling wah-wah pedal to the mix, caressing his instrument with conviction and unabashed zeal.

One of the finest recordings one is to listen to in 2016, a kaleidoscope of crystalline instrumental interplay and stellar vocalizing, within songs that have both depth, thunder and emotion. Lovely artwork, great sonic production and a truly first rate package. This just might finish on top of my 2016 list, as I would have a hard time imagining anyone else knocking this one lower. It's a 'safe asylum'.

5 Innocuous Havens

 Safe Asylum by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.89 | 115 ratings

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Safe Asylum
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by The Jester

4 stars Just a few days ago, Drifting Sun released their new album named Safe Asylum. Safe Alylum has a fantastic cover, made by A Russian artist as Pat Sanders told me, but I don't remember the name to be honest. But in comparison with "Trip" this is better by far! As for the music, it is clear to me that the band tried to create something different this time, in comparison with their previous album. 'Trip the Life Fantastic' was a lighter and more melodic album, with Pat's piano being the leading instrument in most occasions. It was included shorter compositions and more "catchy" melodies. Safe Asylum is darker, with longer and more complex compositions. Because of that, it needs a few more listening in order to appreciate it. With every listening the album "grows" in you, and then it is very hard to leave it aside. There are some similarities with the previous album of course, like for example the beautiful melodic passages and the strong guitar riffs and solos. Safe Asylum includes 8 tracks(plus 2 bonus in the limited edition). 3 of them were included in last year's EP release, under the name 'Alice'. These 3 songs are: Alice, Vagabond and Emphasis. I am not going to get into details and write about each song separately, but I will mention my most favourite songs, which are the following: The Hidden Truth, Intruder, Desolation-Retribution, Wonderland and Gods. The latter is the highlight of the album. (In my opinion, of course). Although Safe Asylum is a rather different album in comparison with 'Trip', it is equally good if not better. Definitely a very serious piece of work that deserves your attention! Recommended to the fans of modern Progressive Rock, Neo-Prog and to all those who can appreciate a well-structured album, with beautiful melodies and strong emotions in it. My Rating would be 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.
 Trip The Life Fantastic by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.85 | 134 ratings

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Trip The Life Fantastic
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by The Jester

4 stars Drifting Sun released their first eponymous album in 1996. Two years later they released the very good 'On the Rebound', and then they disappeared! Now, almost 17 years later they re-appeared again, with a brand new album which is a true jewel! From the old members only Pat Sanders is remaining, who found new musicians and decided to start all over again. This new line up sounds so fresh, and it includes some very good musicians. Now, let's take a closer look on the album' 'Trip the Life Fantastic' includes 10 songs + 1 demo, and has a total running time of almost an hour. The album opens with the same - title song, which is one of the best moments of the album. It's a typical Neo - Prog song, with the keyboards having the leading role before the 3rd minute on which guitar takes over. 'Trip the Life Fantastic' is followed by the (2 -minute long) beautiful and melodic instrumental 'Peach Blossoms'. Next comes 'The Wizard' which is another typical Neo - Prog song, with mellow passages and very good guitar riffs. Another small instrumental piece comes next, the melodic 'Sunsets' with keyboards and acoustic guitar. (I must say that I really enjoyed the idea of putting small instrumental pieces among the songs, because they seem to work as a 'bridge' between the songs). The album continues with 'Lady Night' another beautiful composition, which includes some excellent guitar work. I'm not going to continue writing for each one of the songs, but I would like to mention which songs I like the most: Trip the Life Fantastic, The Wizard, Tormented, and Last Supper. Especially 'Last Supper' is the "progiest" track of the whole album. But the most important thing is that 'Trip the Life Fantastic' is one of those albums which you listen from the start 'till the end, without having to skip any of the songs. Surely there are stronger and weaker moments, but all the songs are of high synthetic standards. I strongly recommend this album to all those who are fans not only of Progressive Rock or Neo - Prog, but Rock in general. It is a really wonderful album! As for my rating, this would be 4.0 stars out of 5.00
 Trip The Life Fantastic by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.85 | 134 ratings

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Trip The Life Fantastic
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by Ivan_Melgar_M
Special Collaborator Symphonic Prog Specialist

4 stars Surprisingly addictive

Received this album a couple days ago as a promotion from my good friend Aapatsos and started to listen it in the car, but the first minutes didn't impressed me, sounded too simple for my taste and a bit derivative from Hogarth Marillion, but as songs advanced, my impression started to change, to the point that I've been listening it repeatedly for the last 48 hours.

Even when this is not the music I usually listen, the passion of Pete Falconer in the vocals and the piano by Pat Sanders captured me more and more, giving me tome to appreciate the impeccable production and the skills of all the members but overall, it's nice to listen a band where the members play for the band rather than for their individual glory. The guitar solos are impressive but always blend cohesively with the music and the rhythm section works like a well oiled machine.

Even when this an album that must be listened from start to end rather than by songs, there are some tracks that impressed me more. In first place the melancholic Peach Blossoms and it's incredibly beautiful piano performance.

Also play special attention to the vibrant The Wizard and the frantic Tormented but overall to the mini epic Last Supper that has a hint of DEEP PURPLE with a great bass and percussion by Dan Storey and Will Jones......Oops, almost forgot the acoustic Ode to Nevermind that reminded me of Steve Hackett.........But listen the album in order without skipping a song, it's worth.

Before I end the review and as an advice, don't expect extremely complex stuff, because you may be disappointed, but if you want to listen good music with beautiful melodies, plenty piano and some strong guitar solos, then Trip The Life Fantastic is your album.

Four solid stars and will search for the previous releases.

 Trip The Life Fantastic by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.85 | 134 ratings

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Trip The Life Fantastic
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by Angelo
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

4 stars Drifting Sun are a band that escaped my attention, because their first two albums were released during a period in which I hardly listened to any music apart from what happened to be on mainstream radio. Had they not released a new album this year, I would probably not have missed them for quite a while, because they are not among the bands that are mentioned on a daily basis. Now that they did release an album, and I have heard of them, I may was well tell the world how I feel about it.

Listening to the album it is clear that the band knows how to build up a song. The title track Trip the Light Fantastic opens the album with piano and high pitched but clean vocals. It fills up with the other instruments over the first half and becomes more guitar driven in the second half - until the piano returns. A similar build up is found in Five Fever, but here the first half is mainly piano and synths.

Completely different to this are The Wizard (with a 70s hard rock feel in the guitar playing, and matching vocals) and the Pendragon like Tormented (fiery guitar opening, prominent bass and keyboards in the vocal parts).

Lady Night and The Last Supper are two longer tracks. The former has great vocal work and pulsing keyboard in places, and seems to be mixed slightly different than the rest of the album (bass and keyboards stand out a bit more).

Last Supper also has a pulsing riff at it's center, but much more prominent than Lady Night. The guitar and organ really work together here, not surprisingly many reviews of this album compare this to old Deep Purple work. There's a lot more going on in this somewhat haunting track than I want to explain here - it's 'hearing is believing' I think.

A separate mention goes to the four short tracks that separate the longer ones. Peach Blossoms and Sunsets are the first two, which have a slightly classical feel to them. The have to bow for the other two though. Ode to Nevermind has a great (electric and acoustic) guitar and bass interplay, and XXX Forever reminds me in a way of a certain Mr. Hackett and Mr. Banks. Without these short interludes this would be a completely different album.

Summarising, this album is very likely not the most renewing thing in the world of rock. That's no disqualification though, because I've heard more quite appealing 'retro' albums over the past six to nine months. Retro is perhaps not even the right word, the band makes music in a style that has been around since early Marillion, Pendragon and other similar bands, but despite an occasional hint to even older times, with a modern touch to it. The compositions work, the vocals are absolutely great and I love the keyboard work. A worthy album to include in 2015s collection.

 Trip The Life Fantastic by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.85 | 134 ratings

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Trip The Life Fantastic
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Jazz-Rock / Fusion / Canterbury Team

3 stars No, thank you very much, this cabaret Neo-Prog-by-numbers is not for me. I find very little fresh or refreshing here. As amateur of fact, a lot of the songs seem as though they are overly drawn out by monotonous repetition of classic rock hooks. All of the songs sound the same--as if Blue Öyster Cult were redoing their "Going Through the Motions"-era music with Freddy Mercury. If Drifting Sun were an actor, they would be the Steven Segal of screen and film.

Almost redeeming songs: the brief Spanish guitar-bass duet "Ode to Nevermind" (8/10); the EPICA-like male castrati vocal of "Five Ever" (8/10), and; the over-the-top 80s Christian epic, "Last Supper" (7/10).

 Trip The Life Fantastic by DRIFTING SUN album cover Studio Album, 2015
3.85 | 134 ratings

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Trip The Life Fantastic
Drifting Sun Neo-Prog

Review by chrisjmartini

5 stars Simply put: an excellent album! Well produced and performed by all involved. Kudos to Pat for writing and organizing such a triumph! Soaring, dramatic vocals by Pete Falconer as well. Each track really takes you on a journey through atmospheric and spacious soundscapes. While some tracks are progressive to the core, others also satisfy the angst of my inner teen hard rock lover. This has not left my Spotify playlist since it's release. No serious prog lover should leave this out of their collection. I'm in agreement with rickdeckard here in that "Last Supper" & "The Wizard" are two of the outstanding songs here.
Thanks to apps79 for the artist addition. and to E&O Team for the last updates

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