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ECLECTIC PROG

A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


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Eclectic Prog definition

The term 'eclectic' in the context of progressive rock describes a summation of elements from various musical sources, and the influences and career paths of bands that take from a wide range of genres or styles. While progressive music can be, in a larger sense, eclectic, the 'Eclectic Prog' term is specially meant to reference bands that trespass the boundaries of established Progressive Rock genres or that blend many influences.

Eclectic Prog combines hybrids of style and diversity of theme, promoting many elements from different sources. The Eclectic category recognizes bands that evolved markedly over their career (in a progressive, evolutionary way), or have a plural style without a clear referential core.

The basic features lie within the music's variety, rich influences, art tendencies and classic prog rock elements. Among the representative bands are KING CRIMSON, VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR, and GENTLE GIANT.

- written by Ricochet (Victor)

Current Team as at 14/02/2018

Kevin (Magnum Vaeltaja)
Ian (Tapfret)
Simon (Mascodagama)

Eclectic Prog Top Albums


Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Eclectic Prog | More Top Prog lists and filters

4.62 | 3849 ratings
IN THE COURT OF THE CRIMSON KING
King Crimson
4.54 | 3043 ratings
RED
King Crimson
4.49 | 1854 ratings
GODBLUFF
Van Der Graaf Generator
4.42 | 2597 ratings
LARKS' TONGUES IN ASPIC
King Crimson
4.42 | 1971 ratings
PAWN HEARTS
Van Der Graaf Generator
4.36 | 1518 ratings
IN A GLASS HOUSE
Gentle Giant
4.31 | 1486 ratings
H TO HE, WHO AM THE ONLY ONE
Van Der Graaf Generator
4.30 | 1422 ratings
THE POWER AND THE GLORY
Gentle Giant
4.29 | 1744 ratings
OCTOPUS
Gentle Giant
4.29 | 1366 ratings
STILL LIFE
Van Der Graaf Generator
4.31 | 768 ratings
THE SILENT CORNER AND THE EMPTY STAGE
Hammill, Peter
4.28 | 1358 ratings
FREE HAND
Gentle Giant
4.26 | 1362 ratings
ACQUIRING THE TASTE
Gentle Giant
4.23 | 1270 ratings
VOYAGE OF THE ACOLYTE
Hackett, Steve
4.27 | 500 ratings
ANABELAS
Bubu
4.25 | 445 ratings
BANTAM TO BEHEMOTH
Birds And Buildings
4.26 | 378 ratings
MEMENTO Z BANALNYM TRYPTYKIEM
SBB
4.19 | 665 ratings
SLEEPING IN TRAFFIC - PART TWO
Beardfish
4.12 | 1944 ratings
LIZARD
King Crimson
4.15 | 790 ratings
SPECTRAL MORNINGS
Hackett, Steve

Eclectic Prog overlooked and obscure gems albums new


Random 4 (reload page for new list) | As selected by the Eclectic Prog experts team

I'M NORMAL, MY HEART STILL WORKS
Illŕchime Quartet
SENNI ESKELINEN & STRINGPURÉE BAND
Stringpurée Band
ZEALOTRY STERBLICHEN SCHIZOPHRENIA
Seamus
DADARUHI
Replikas

Latest Eclectic Prog Music Reviews


 Pawn Hearts by VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.42 | 1971 ratings

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Pawn Hearts
Van Der Graaf Generator Eclectic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars In just a few short years, Peter Hammill's VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR project had evolved from a de facto solo effort ("The Aerosol Grey Machine") to an early progressive rock band ("The Least We Can Do Is Wave To Each Other") and then up another few notches to one of the most innovative and boundary pushing pioneers within the prog world on "H To He Who Am The Only One." And as if the world were coming to end in the foreseeable future, this outlandish quartet that consisted of Peter Hammill, Hugh Benton, David Jackson and Guy Evans went for the jugular on their fourth album PAWN HEARTS, an album so gorged full of musical ideas that it seems like it's ready to collapse under its own bloated grandeur in a shriveled heap of sonic sesquipedalian entropy. But it did not and instead created a beacon of complexity that would continue the arms race of proposing which band could compose the most challenging and daring music set in a rock context possible. The album's title resulted from a humorous spoonerism where Jackson stated "I'll go down to the studio and dub on some more porn harts", meaning "horn parts".

It is without question that PAWN HEARTS ranks as VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR's most complex album and arguably one of the most demanding listens within the progressive rock paradigm. Often a rather love or hate sort of affair in no doubt due to Peter Hammill's Bowie-esque schizoid vocal style, this is a band that prog fans love or hate but perhaps the hate side of the equation is a result of simply not being indoctrinated fully into their own little private club of the prog universe. While my first exposure offered intrigue, i can't say that i loved it. What it did was make me want to investigate and delve into its idiosyncratic charm in order to unlock the secrets that await like an ET Bhuddist monk holding the key to longevity in some mysterious underground fortress in Mongolia or something. The virtuosic and tightened band effect was due to the fact that VDGG hit the road and relentless played their material from "H to He?" on the infamous "Six Bob" tour which featured other Charisma Records acts like Genesis and Lindisfarne. The band was said to be almost impossible to top as they reached their creative peak live performances as well as in the studio with the emergence of PAWN HEARTS, an album so sublime that it is one of the rare sonic portals into a truly alternative universe.

Despite the precarious balance of elements on board, somehow like a lion tamer in the circus, these musical pioneers subdued their wild and adventurous beast into one of progressive rock's most elegant displays of pomp and awe with an ever changing eclectic carousel ride through multi-layered suites that more often threaten to derail the melodic tightrope act but somehow emerge from the chaos like an egg dropped from the top of the Empire State Building only by happenstance to land on someone's lost down comforter. PAWN HEARTS has emerged through the decades as one of the pinnacles of progressive rock with its undulating relentless pursuit for complexity that takes the seemingly innocent although demented melodies of Peter Hammill's keyboardist singer / songwriting skills and teasing and torturing them until monstrous mountains of sound meander about in psychedelic hallucinations that realize the potentials of the 60s but taken to the proggy promised lands by raising the bar so high that very few have dared even tread these exalted elevations of exuberance.

While the late 60s was ground zero for the most experimental and adventurous musical explorations to have emerged since the dawning of recorded music, few took this opportunity to heart more than VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR. By 1971, the somewhat rotating cast of members had stabilized into the classic lineup with mainman Hammill forging his role as lead vocalist, keyboardist and conductor of everything demented, dark and dangerous. In accord, Benton would follow suit with his double role as bassist and second keyboardist which was one of the features that allowed VDGG an over-the-top and in-yer-face musical approach. And likewise Jackson, the band's one-man wind section provided the appropriate jazzy touches with healthy doses of the avant-garde in the forms of tenor, alto and soprano saxophones and flute would often bedazzle audiences with an uncanny propensity to play two different wind instruments simultaneously. While Guy Evans would provide the varied percussive sounds, he would also provide an extra layer of piano strewn throughout. Through the relentless tours of 1970, VDGG caught the attention of King Crimson's Robert Fripp who signed up as guest guitarist making PAWN HEARTS a veritable classic of the ages indeed. Granted, i agree with those who find the guitar duties a little underwhelming as they hardly take the limelight but if one listens attentively, they are there!

Despite the relentless strive to go where no musicians had gone before, in VDGG's native UK, it was a bit too much too soon, however Peter Hammill's passionate vocal style and rather symphonically driven eclectic prog was a major hit in Italy where PAWN HEARTS hit #1 on the album charts while failing to make even the smallest dent in Britain. And so it was VDGG's destiny to find solidarity in Italy where they would find themselves touring and pleasing their largest fanbase. The Italians were right on board with the outlandish, overwrought and passionate vocal styles coupled with classically infused progressive rock tendencies that pushed the limits as evidenced by some of the biggest Italian acts to follow. While Genesis got much credit for their symphonic pastoral contributions in the Italian prog scene, VDGG was in fact one of the main contributors with their ability to shapeshift pleasant yet seductive melodies into progressive powerhouse performances that let loose the full fury of psychedelic rock infused with the complexities of jazz, classical and the furthest reaches of the avant-garde.

PAWN HEARTS consists of a mere three tracks (except for the US and Canadian releases) but in reality contains more creative ideas than most bands muster up in their entire career thus making it not only VDGG's most ambitious and complex album of their entire career but also ranks way up there in terms of most intrepid, inspiring, emulous and zealous albums released in the entire era of recorded music with a burning desire to go where no musical entity had gone before thanks to the big bang of progressive rock inspiration fathered by the great Robert Fripp and his King Crimson outfit. I would be remiss to omit the contributions of Tony Stratton-Smith whose further explorations into the development and arrangements of PAWN HEARTS would have gone nowhere without his involvement. Despite the claim that PAWN HEARTS as well as any VDGG release is a Peter Hammill dominated one-man show, nothing could be further from the truth as much of the structural edification of the album was brought to life by the contributions of others. For some reason in the US and Canadian releases there was a fourth track added after "Lemmings" called "Theme One" which was written by none other than fifth Beatle member George Martin but has been demoted to merely a bonus track on newer versions.

"Lemmings" including "Cog" (11:39) While "H To He Who Am The Only One" seemed to castigate the powerful elite for their overweening misuse of testosterone in their relentless domination of humanity, on PAWN HEARTS, the opener "Lemmings" seems to take a jab at the populace themselves for relinquishing their freewill and allowing these tyrants to have their way. This opener immediately screams that VDGG has come of age. They have relentlessly nurtured their freak flag talents and taken them to the next level or two. While the backbone of the tune revolves around Hammill's usual piano based vocal style, the track takes no time at all to delve into schizoid dissonant segments that implement a psychedelic synthesized frosting with jazzified prog stabs and admittedly totally far out weirdness that is beyond bizarre even by modern day standards.

********** "Theme One" (2:55) Another mystery of the universe comes in this surprise. One that i wasn't even aware of until i started this review. Surprisingly this was written by George Martin, yeah that George Martin, producer or "fifth member" of The Beatles who wrote this track which only appears on the earliest of US and Canadian vinyl editions. This bouncy jazzy pop track has since been nixed as it totally feels out of place. Perhaps a slightly more digestible track to attract interest? I dunno. Shatters my personal experience for sure. NOT RATING THIS ALBUM on the basis of its inclusion. I'm going to pretend i never knew this existed.

"Man-Erg" (10:19) is perhaps the most "normal" track on the album. While beginning with a seemingly innocent piano ballad style that would become a Hammill solo staple, it retains a sense of melancholy and darkness. While the piano riff is recurrent it's not until the track shifts into the schizoid and jittery angular and bizarrely timed heavy rock section that alternates abruptly that things get really wild and out of control. It has been suggested that the title is an anagram of "German" and in actuality about Hitler, which in retrospect, 1970 was within an era not totally removed from the reality of the period. Perhaps about the duality of good and evil, the possibility that any man can attain a god complex and find a way to justify any atrocity. Some of the most thought provoking lyrics in conjunct with a dualistic compositional approach. The ultimate Jekyll and Hyde composition.

"A Plague of Lighthouse Keepers" (23:04) is not only the album's magnus opus but even claimed by the band members themselves to be the pinnacle of creative fortitude. While the side long vinyl track that in reality was a multitude of individual musical pieces composed by the various members that were only later in the studio stitched together to create a meaningful unified theme as it was in essence a batch of snippets that were recorded between gigs only to emerge as the progressive behemoth that appears on the album. While deep analysis of a deeper meaning can spiral into a fertile imagination to infinity, the truth is that Hammill claims the track is really very simply about the story of a lighthouse keeper and the experiences of life and death and the psychological baggage involved. While the storyline is clear, the musical construct is anything but as it navigates through ten distinct movements with none logically connected to the others. However the main opening melodic riff recurs throughout offering a stabilizing factor to an otherwise nebulous journey through the sonic universe. PAWN HEARTS seeded the musical universe in unforeseen ways and many future bands would pick some of the ripe fruits that were never really further developed by the band itself. For example, at 16:37 this musical monstrosity develops into a schizoid marching band type of frenetic outbreak which seems like the blueprint for the spastic zolo style adopted by the Cardiacs and other bands like Oingo Boingo down the road.

Despite VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR receiving lavish praise from some UK critics, the band unfortunately fell to deaf ears in their homeland and concentrated their efforts on their lucrative success in Italy where they engaged in a grueling tour schedule which ultimately led to burn out and the first break up of the band. Hammill continued with the other members on his less crazed solo albums and after a few years of recovery would return for 1975's lauded "Godbluff," but they would settle into a more streamlined prog sound and leave behind the everything-but-the-kitchen-sink approach. PAWN HEARTS remains one of the pinnacles of progressive rock and a fan favorite as it exudes a brash bravado that transcends the time and space from which it was created. Desert isle pick if there ever was one.

The eerily constructed melodies are sadistically addictive and the labyrinthine compositional approach means that you can literally listen to this one over a hundred times and still be surprised by how it zigzags around through its many movements and schizophrenic outbursts. If you think you can understand PAWN HEARTS by a single listen or even ten, you'd be fooling yourself as this is one of those albums that is so bold and so daring that even for hardened proggers such as myself, it took many years to finally come to grips with. However in its wake it has emerged as one of my top 10 favorite albums of all time and i can say that despite not making such lists due to my preferences changing frequently. Needless to say, PAWN HEARTS is not only VDGG's creative peak but one of progressive rock's crowning achievements. You better believe five stars in every way. Compositionally, lyrically, performance-wise and creatively weird as bleep. It just doesn't get better than this one especially for the year it materialized.

 Young Lions by BELEW, ADRIAN album cover Studio Album, 1990
2.20 | 32 ratings

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Young Lions
Adrian Belew Eclectic Prog

Review by TCat
Prog Reviewer

2 stars This was one of Adrian Belew's attempts at a more accessible pop which was released during one of the times that King Crimson was on sabbatical. It was released between "Three of a Perfect Pair" and "Thrak". He was also head guitarist for David Bowie's concerts during this time. He also released a few albums during this down period for King Crimson, some of them good and some of them questionable. "Young Lions" is one of those albums that is questionable at best and definitely not as progressive than some of the others if at all.

The album starts out well enough for a pop album with 3 decent songs; "Young Lions" which makes for a great upbeat opener, "Pretty Pink Rose" which is written by David Bowie and features him singing lead which is a great surprise, and "Heartbeat", a King Crimson song done to a pop beat, which actually sounds good considering the way it's been made radio friendly. So, you might have at least a 3 star album by this point and there is plenty of room to grow here. Unfortunately, things take a turn for the worst.

The next song is "Looking for a U.F.O. which is just a complete embarrassment. Pop rhythms with annoying lyrics and no feeling whatsoever. The downward spiral continues with "I Am What I Am" which is the spoken word of Prophet Omega talking over what might have been an okay guitar solo if not for his distracting ramblings. Then he does a cover of The Traveling Wilburys' "Not Alone Anymore". So this is a great song when done by the Wilburys and Belew does a decent job of the cover, but adds nothing and takes nothing away, so there really is no point.

"Men in Helicopters" has a good message, and is also a slight turn for the better here because it doesn't sound so forced as the previous tracks. There is some nice guitar work during the instrumental break with other sounds going on. "Small World" is just bland and uninspired. There is a some harmonization over a lot of drums that sounds like some bad Jeff Lynne impression. I'd almost rather hear Disney's version of "It's a Small World After All", but not really. I think he's trying to be Peter Gabriel here too, but failing miserably. "Phone Call from the Moon" has some nice jazzy Robin Trower style guitar work, but the spoken part of the lyrics is pathetic: "Time moves slowly like the curve of the Earth" and so on. Okay whatever. Bowie returns thank goodness, for the last track "Gunman". Just to prove that Adrian is actually a great talent, the guitar is excellent, what you would expect on a KC album or one of Belew's better albums.

Not sure what happened here, but it started off pretty good and ended good with one decent song in the middle, but more than half of this is just plain worse than mediocre. Not really worth looking into this one, but try some of his better solo albums, or get a King Crimson album released during his time with that band if you want to hear Belew at his best.

 Is It? by TELIOF album cover Studio Album, 2008
4.45 | 26 ratings

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Is It?
Teliof Eclectic Prog

Review by DamoXt7942
Forum & Site Admin Group Avant, Crossover & Neo Teams

5 stars What a terrific soundscape.

An Israeli combo TELIOF's debut album "Is It?" has been released in 2008 as one of amazing stuffs all over the progressive rock world. It's apparent they've got extremely influenced by 70s British progressive rock especially Genesis or Earth & Fire (as for the latter, through the second track "Die For Us" we can hear their chorus texture obviously like "Song Of The Marching Children"), but crazy amazingly they should not play tiny imitation nor simple mixture of the pioneers.

Their complicated melodic structure blended with pop and catchy nuance sounds quite serious but charming. Such a fascinating phenomenon can be directly heard in the first track "They Believe We Exist" ... where we can accept easily and enjoyably what they've launched cynically, violently and weirdly. The female voices based upon fine male chorus are clearly delightful. we should get immersed into their sound kaleidoscope created, crystallized with all instruments (especially the electric piano) as a sound chaser, and get drenched in their energetic sound magma.

The third (and the longest) track "It Is" suite is kinda theatrical architecture. Easily able to imagine they have played fully with hope and relax in a studio. It's surprising every single member and instrument explodes forward his/her/its attitude and intention. No part cannot be beaten by other ones, and all are harmonized and synchronized perfectly. And another interest is that there is little minor key nor negative atmosphere all over the suite. Of our comfort are tremendously fine, fantastic melodic / sound footsteps from the beginning until the end. Yes 24 minutes will go away from our ear soon. Even the last two short tracks are sorta killers seasoned with incredible instrumental spices like violin madness or saxophone drone.

We can send them ungrudging admiration, the loudest applause via such a stimulating sound elegance definitely.

 Islands by KING CRIMSON album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.80 | 1695 ratings

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Islands
King Crimson Eclectic Prog

Review by Ludenberger

3 stars The 4th and final album of the Sinfield era, "Islands" is romantic, experimental and jazzier than ever. It holds the advantage over "Lizard" in some ways, especially because Boz Burrell, a much better vocalist (and my personal favorite), and Ian Wallace, a much more creative drummer, hop on board for this mostly relaxed album. Robert Fripp also plays a much larger role, exemplified with his "Sailor's Tale" that is somewhat of a precursor to the wonderful experimentation that would happen in "Larks' Tongues in Aspic" 2 years later.

The album opens with "Formentera Lady," which isn't the typical King Crimson album opener expected of the previous albums, but it really sets the tone for an exotic experience. It begins with Keith Tippet's signature piano flourishes and some outstanding saxophone work from Mel Collins. The vocal work from Boz Burrell is some of the best on the album, and Ian Wallace's percussion in this song sounds like what was to come from players like Bill Bruford or Jamie Muir. The song is also a whopping ten minutes, but like most KC songs, it doesn't overstay its welcome.

"The Letters" is a somber song with more excellent vocals, especially near the end of the song. As I said, "Sailor's Tale" is one of the great experimental works from not only the band but also Mel Collins, however I think this song does overstay its welcome in length, especially after "Formentera Lady."

Speaking of overly long songs, one song that I've never been fond of is "Prelude: Song of the Gulls," which is pleasant for about a minute but goes absolutely nowhere. I get that it's supposed to be a calm buildup before the final track, but it's just not fulfilling enough and "Islands" just isn't as powerful as songs like "Lizard" and "The Court of the Crimson King."

Another great moment on this record is "Ladies of the Road," with harmonies comparable to that of The Beach Boys in the chorus, which is easily the highlight of the song. I also love how Mel Collins uses the saxophone on this track, making it work with a bluesy number such as this.

Overall, the record isn't nearly as strong as the previous ones, but it's pretty good regardless. 3/5

 Lizard by KING CRIMSON album cover Studio Album, 1970
4.12 | 1944 ratings

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Lizard
King Crimson Eclectic Prog

Review by Ludenberger

5 stars After the release of "In The Wake Of Poseidon" and most of the original band going off to pursue other musical avenues, most bands would just part ways, not bounce back to release the eclectic masterpiece that is "Lizard." Not only did King Crimson managed to pull the impossible off like they always do, but they even managed to release it in the same year as the previous album. Like "In The Court of the Crimson King," this album shows that KC are already ahead of other artists by leaps and bounds.

Fripp and Sinfield remain from the original band, making even more of a collaborative effort this time between two creative minds. Not only does Pete Sinfield return to write the lyrics, this time he also designs one of King Crimson's finest album covers, as well as one of prog's finest. Mel Collins joins the band as an official member this time around, bringing his amazing flute and especially amazing saxophone skills to the table. As for other members, Gordon Haskell comes on to do most of the vocals and bass guitars here, and he does a fine job, but not an outstanding one. Andy McCulloch is the drummer of the band, but it seems like he was just told to do his best impression of what Michael Giles was doing.

Moving forward from where the last two albums left off, "Lizard" decides to go in the jazzier direction that the early band seemed destined to go in at some point. Flutes, saxophones, trombones, cornets, and more take the spotlight, as opposed to a more traditional rock format using guitars. Many jazz sections are found in the tracks on this album, especially on tracks like "Indoor Games" and the title track.

"Cirkus" is the perfect opening track, and it immediately grabs your attention with abstract lyrics, and the highlight of the song, which are the menacing mellotron and horn sections after each verse. It's also one of Haskell's finest vocal performances on the album, and overall, a circus I like coming back to again and again.

"Indoor Games" follows a similar bombastic format to "Cirkus," getting even jazzier this time. With a "hey ho" from Haskell, we're launched into the next attraction of the circus, which is "Happy Family." Many consider this to be a weak song, but I think it's the perfect culmination of what "Cirkus" and "Indoor Games" were leading up to. Oh, and it's about the Beatles, too.

"Lady of the Dancing Water" is similar to "Cadence and Cascade," and although I probably like "Cadence" a bit more, this is such a peaceful song to close off the first side, giving the first 3 songs room for a better experience. The best part of the song is Collins's flute playing, and it echoes the brilliance of Ian McDonald's playing on "I Talk To The Wind."

Finally, the track that makes this album a prog essential is the title track of "Lizard." First and foremost, it is one of the first side-long suites in prog, coming in a year before ELP would release "Tarkus." It set a trend that other artists such as Genesis and Yes would take inspiration from. Speaking of Yes, one of the best things on the song is the fact that Jon Anderson, the vocalist for Yes, comes in to sing "Prince Rupert Awakens," and the song fits his voice perfectly. Next in the suite we move directly into "Bolero," the jazziest piece on the album which culminates in crashing cymbals, leading into the chilling opening notes of "The Battle Of Glass Tears." This section takes up most of the suite, but it doesn't disappoint and it really feels like a battle. Even Haskell's vocals fit the section well, representing a calm before the storm. The suite is ended off with "Big Top," a short nostalgic piece on the mellotron that never fails to give me chills.

Even though this album is said to be "hard to get into," it is worth it and overtime, its true musical excellence of "Lizard" starts to show. 5/5

 Danger Money by UK album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.73 | 328 ratings

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Danger Money
UK Eclectic Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars REview Nş 185

"Danger Money" is the second studio album of U.K. and was released in 1979. U.K. was one of the most prominent prog rock groups of the late 70's and one of the first of a concept that would be called "a super-group". The album was released in the following year of the release of their debut album. It features John Wetton, Eddie Jobson and Terry Bozzio. Of the original line up only Wetton and Jobson remained, having Allan Holdsworth and Bill Bruford, departed.

Following two lengthy American live tours, Wetton and Jobson decided to fire Holdsworth due to over musical differences. Bruford chose to depart as well. Bruford soon formed the jazz rock fusion group, Bruford, and invited Holdsworth to join him. After the departure of Bruford and Holdsworth, the remaining band's members decided don't bring another guitarist for the group. Instead, they became a trio with the presence of the new drummer Terry Bozzio. Bozzio was another one time band's member of Frank Zappa. So, U.K. became a trio with an ELP's classic line up.

So, the line on the album is Eddie Jobson (keyboards and electric violin), John Wetton (lead vocals and bass guitar) and Terry Bozzio (drums and percussion).

"Danger Money" has six tracks. All songs were written by Eddie Jobson and John Wetton. The first track is the title track "Danger Money". It's a song that begins with a very apocalyptic, massive and bombastic sound. Jobson's keyboards are the main musical instruments on this bombastic piece of music that construct the main body of the song. This song shows tthat this new album from the band has more straightforward melodies, many instrumental passages and quirky structure changes. This is a great opener for the album with pure powerful progressive rock. The second track "Rendezvous 6:02", points further more into a pop direction, resting gently on Jobson's acoustic sounding electric piano, playing in a jazzy musical vein during the instrumental section and competing against increasingly and beautiful musical cascades of the synthesizers. This is a lovely and sweet song very well performed that reminds to my mind the good old days of King Crimson's ballads. It was released as a single to promote the album. The third track "The Only Thing She Needs" represents Bozzio's showcase with a solo near the beginning of the song. Despite he is a great drummer he wasn't yet, in my humble opinion, in the Bruford's league. However, he was good enough to handle the chores. The song is also dominated by Jobson, and he is really a truly versatile and virtuoso musician. The piano sounds simply great and the song culminates into a great violin solo with a great bass line and a dynamic drumming. The fourth track "Caesar's Palace Blues" is a song that opens with a Jobson's demoniac electric violin alternately sounding like a heavy metal guitarist. This is another strong rock song, this time dominated by a Jobson's violin work. It's probably the jazziest song on the album with a Wetton's great vocal work too. It's also a great progressive track where, once more, Jobson shines. The fifth track "Nothing To Lose" was the track that I heard first on the radio. This was also a track released as a single to promote the album. In retrospect, now we can say this song pointed the way to a more digestible form of progressive rock that Wetton preferred, and provided probably the formula for his next progressive band, Asia. This is without any doubt the weakest, and the only weak track on the album. The sixth and last track "Carrying No Cross" is that obligatory epic track that you must find on any good progressive rock album. This is the kind of the tracks that a truly hard core progressive fan, prefers. With a temperament that flows meticulously like a truly symphonic piece of music, great vocals and frenzy of almost everything on Jobson's musical instruments. It was clearly constructed as a stage crowd pleaser with over twelve minutes length. This is a song that reminds me strongly Keith Emerson and the good old times of Emerson, Lake & Palmer. If you want to know why Eddie Jobson is considered a wizard keyboardist, this is the song you must hear. The guy is really an amazing keyboardist.

Conclusion: "Danger Money" represents a landmark in the progressive rock music. It marked definitely the end of the classic prog rock era. After that point, it seemed that the major participants in the decade of progressive rock golden era, or disbanded or moved on to a more commercial realms. Yes reformed with Trevor Rabin with simpler, shorter and radio friendly songs, Genesis continued their transformation to a pop rock band and Asia was formed with John Wetton and Yes' guitarist Steve Howe around the same time and with the same musical style. So, "Danger Money" is a great album and became a very special album in the progressive rock music of the 70's. This is almost a perfect album where "Only Thing To Lose" disappoints, and is the only obstacle that prevents me from giving 5 stars to this album. Unfortunately, this was the last studio album from this great prog rock band. But fortunately this virtuoso handful of musicians, left beyond two scintillating and genuine prog studio releases. It was a shame that U.K. has over, really.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Ultrasound by PIXIE NINJA album cover Studio Album, 2017
4.00 | 3 ratings

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Ultrasound
Pixie Ninja Eclectic Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars Needless to say but the Scandinavian countries have had more than their fair share of totally creative and out-of-the-box approaches in the music scene over the past few decades conjuring everything up from creatively bizarre progressive rock to the most extreme forms of metal and all of this despite their population of human specimens being quite small in comparison to the rest of the planet. Norway in particular has seen some extraordinarily brilliant musical acts emerging with their latest prog superstars Wobbler making its way into the classic prog lineup with their latest album "From Silence To Somewhere." Emerging the same year in the middle of 2017 also comes another Norwegian act called PIXIE NINJA. This isn't your ordinary sort of band that is starting from scratch but rather the collaborative efforts of many seasoned musicians getting together to unleash their full eclectic and creative potentials.

Jostein Haugen (guitar, bass, keyboards) from Rusty Crown

Marius Leirĺnes (guitar, bass, keyboards) also from Rusty Crown

Mattias Olsson (drums, mellotron) from AK-Momo, Akaba, Ănglagard, Kaukasus, Molesome, Necromonkey, Two Times Trauma, Vly, Walrus, Weserbergland, White Willow

Ketil Vestrum Einarsen (flute) from Geir Lysne Listening Ensemble, Jaga Jazzist, Kaukasus, Weserbergland, White Willow, Wobbler, Motorpsycho)

Johan Hals Jřrgensen (keyboards) is the only newbie in the mix with PIXIE NINJA serving as his debut into the eclectic world of progressive rock music.

ULTRASOUND is the debut album of PIXIE NINJA who hail from Rognan in the frozen north of Norway and this album is the result of founding members Jostein Haugen and Marius Leirĺnes' love of the various styles of progressive rock that have flourished since the classic era. Given the eclectic mix of bands these guys have played in, one would expect an equally eclectic delivery of styles and that's exactly what PIXIE NINJA deliver. And while over experienced musicians can often cancel each other out instead of bring out the best in each other, i am happy to report that it is the latter that shines. While this all instrumental album starts things off with the aptly titled "Auditory Hallucinations" that utilizes a progressive electronic style not too far removed from such German acts as Tangerine Dream or Klaus Schulze, things turn to the dark side as it becomes more spacey and detached before jumping into a wild upbeat electronic segment that cranks out its best IDM before morphing into an Aphex Twin type frazzle that brings out the rock guitar and propels it firmly into space rock territory.

"Elusive The Wind Vane" takes a new route with a jittery time signature rich guitar riff and jazzified drum rolls is nevertheless smoothed out by a sweet fluttering flute riff that slowly gains power into a caffeinated virtuosic frenzy. The rhythm plods along in 7/4 timing relentlessly in motorik hypnotic fashion as layers of keyboards add increasing layers of counterpoints while the groovy bass and rock guitar plod along. After a few changes in tempo and dynamics, the track lets loose at the end and gets soooooo wild. One of my favorites. "Une Promenade" takes a breather as a short piano piece. Nothing exciting here. "Polysomnographic" jumps back into the mind muck freakery with some sort of distant "conversation?" on the keys while a simple riff slowly builds. While the main riff stays slow, a separate one gets faster and faster until voila?. a space rock track is born with jazzy drumming and super spacey keyboards and what sounds like a singing theremin.

The longest track "Personal Improvement Cult" which slinks in over the eleven minute mark starts with some vibraphone sounding tinkles and an almost symphonic drone that find a bass taking baby steps to a much larger universe. As it progressively ramps up, a drumbeat joins in which takes the whole thing through several moods and movements that meander through the allotted timespan. The longest piece is also one of the coolest with its incessant attention to detail and a road map to the boonies of the sound spectrum where you can get lost for a while. The short title track finds a strangely psychedelic flute fluttering around a down-tuned guitar that quickly turns into a heavily synthesized rock track before fading out with some strange electronic sounds that bloop and bleep around like a malfunctioning robot on Tatooine which finds the album ending much as it began in full electronic form.

ULTRASOUND is the perfect example of a high quality and creative 21st century progressive rock experience with well seasoned musicians taking a stab at an interesting slice of experimental approaches that are fundamentally rooted in the classic sounds of King Crimson, Pink Floyd, Tangerine Dream and beyond. There is a lot more attention paid to the electronic aspects than the average rock band as the electronics seem to be the dominant focus with the heavier rock elements taking a backseat and only used for a more bombastic contrast, however when they let loose allowing the guitar, bass and drums to overpower the electronics, PIXIE NINJA sound most like the "Red" era of King Crimson. ULTRASOUND is an excellently performed and exquisitely produced album that allows every tiny sonic tidbit to shine and not to mention that the arrangements are friggin' perfect. While not quite a masterpiece of the ages due to some apparent filler segments, the overall run of this album is quite satisfying. A modern day favorite and i eagerly await more exciting musical constructs from the great PIXIE NINJA! Also one of my favorite album covers of the year!

 In The Wake Of Poseidon by KING CRIMSON album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.83 | 1916 ratings

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In The Wake Of Poseidon
King Crimson Eclectic Prog

Review by Ludenberger

4 stars Even though "In The Wake Of Poseidon" lacks the impact and innovation of King Crimson's debut, it certainly isn't a sophomore slump. It isn't nearly as adventurous of an album, and most of the tracks derive from songs on "In The Court," but by no means does this make it bad. It does a pretty serviceable job of following up one of the best progressive rock albums of all time, in my opinion.

For this album, the only remaining and credited members in the band are Robert Fripp and Peter Sinfield. Greg Lake still lends his vocal talent on most of the songs, but his bass parts were left unfinished after he joined ELP, so King Crimson alumni Peter Giles steps in to record the bass parts. Ian McDonald still holds writing credits to songs on the album, but the great Mel Collins fills in for his woodwind parts and Keith Tippett fills in the spot for a pianist. Fripp also picks up the keyboards, something that would be seen on every KC album to come, save for David Cross playing some here and there in the mid-70s. Gordon Haskell, one of Fripp's good friends at the time, sings on "Cadence and Cascade," since vocals were unfinished by Lake. Michael Giles also returns to bring his stroke of brilliance on the drums, but he just plays as a session musician this time around.

Even with all of these drastic personnel changes, King Crimson still manages to pull off a great album, although not as tight of an experience as "In The Court of the Crimson King."

One of the more notable and inventive tracks on the album is "Peace," which is scattered throughout the album in three sections, and the final section is just beautiful. The vocal performance from Lake is so touching and calming, and Fripp's simple guitar work makes all of the difference.

"Cat Food" is also the most adventurous, off-the-wall, and just amazing things on the album. The concept is absolutely bonkers: I originally thought it was a blues tune about how bad cat food is, but I was actually corrected (see comments) and the song is really about how frozen food and food manufactured to just be heated up is bad, so the band is comparing it to cat food. Still, a pretty bizarre concept and definitely progressive lyrically. It also contains bits of nods to the Beatles, such as the bassline being eerily similar to "Come Together." This is the best song on the album, and the things that really make it are Lake's amazing vocal performance and Keith Tippett's abstract piano additions.

"The Devil's Triangle" is a wonderfully intense instrumental piece mostly by Fripp on the mellotron, and some writing and arrangements done by McDonald. "Garden of Worm" is the best section on this monster of a track, and it even includes vocal samples from "The Court of the Crimson King" from the first album.

"Cadence and Cascade" is simply breathtaking, and still one of King Crimson's best tracks to date. Gordon Haskell does a fine job on vocals (even if they were pitched during mixing) and it is a beautiful song, especially during the section starting with the lyrics "Caravan hotel..."

"Pictures of a City" is good, but it is evident that this song is heavily based on "21st Century Schizoid Man" and it begs for more development. It's an enjoyable song, and I especially enjoy Peter Giles's performance on this track. The title track is also derivative of past songs, sounding similar to "Epitaph" and using lyrical structure similar to that of "The Court of the Crimson King." However, Lake's vocal performance is great here, and Fripp and Sinfield's chemistry is shown through the guitar sounds made in response to certain lyrics. My only real gripe about the song is its lackluster interlude entitled "Libra's Theme."

Overall, it's a 4/5. Yes, it has more flaws than the debut, but it is still a solid album and is worth it if you really liked the first album (I certainly did.) Thankfully, the ever-progressive King Crimson catalogue gets even better from here.

 Starless And Bible Black by KING CRIMSON album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.93 | 1645 ratings

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Starless And Bible Black
King Crimson Eclectic Prog

Review by WFV

5 stars Scrolling through these reviews I'm not surprised at all Red is considered the masterpiece and Starless is the headed stepchild. I've found most of the masses go for the glossy streamlined product. Me, I'll take the rougher road less traveled any day of the week.

My history with this album is deep - I found a pirated cassette in a store in my hometown called Big Lots when I was seventeen. My curiousity for prog music was already there from having heard Roundabout many times on classic rock radio. Still, that was pretty much it as I didn't know anybody who liked or collected prog music as a youth. My friends and I used to go to this store to look for music, I remember discovering tapes by the Chi-Lites and the Blind Boys of Mississippi, things like that. Well, when I stumbled upon Starless and Bible Black and saw the name King Crimson, I snatched it up right away, remembering from the liner notes I had read in the Rush Chronicles CD I bought from a used CD store that Geddy's gang used to play King Crimson when they were starting.

If I remember correctly upon leaving the store I popped it straight into the tape player in my 1988 Pontiac Le Mans. The first side I was a bit confused, but upon hearing Starless and Bible Black and Fracture I was mindblown. I had never, ever, ever heard anything like those tracks.

Nobody else in the car thought as I did. I think they wanted me to put back the Jane's Addiction tape.

It took me a while to develop a healthy regard for side A, and while We'll Let You Know may be a throwaway, I still like the sound of it. Ironically, I still love side B, but my favorite song here and maybe (this is saying a lot) in the Crimson canon is Trio.

In my eyes, Red is the girl you take home to mom and Starless and Bible Black is the girl you go out with on the sly. I've come to the conclusion my prog tastes ultimately swing in the King Crimson direction and if I had to pick one of the many great albums I'd pick Starless and Bible Black. Any album that begins with the words "Health Food Faggot" deserves the top spot.

 In The Court Of The Crimson King by KING CRIMSON album cover Studio Album, 1969
4.62 | 3849 ratings

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In The Court Of The Crimson King
King Crimson Eclectic Prog

Review by Ludenberger

5 stars This is it... THE progressive rock album. The album that countless prog artists draw inspiration from, even to this day. Simply put, even though progressive rock music was well on the rise in the late 1960s, the "classic wave" of prog was initiated by "In The Court." This album truly defined what prog rock meant, and at the time it was like nothing else the rock genre had ever seen... but you've no doubt heard all of this. Now for the quality of the album as a whole.

"In The Court" brings together a truly spectacular team of musicians, including the early guitar brilliance of Robert Fripp (who, at the time, wasn't as major of a component in the group as he would come to be), the bass and chilling vocals of Greg Lake, Michael Giles's punchy drum lines that vastly increase the depth of each song on here, and the mystical lyrics of Pete Sinfield that rival the writing styles of Lewis Carroll himself. However, the member that I think really shines on this album is Ian McDonald: his intense and artful saxophone playing, his gentle strokes of brilliance from several woodwind instruments, and of course, one of the earliest uses of a prog staple, the mellotron. Each member brings something new to the table, and I love that about this album. If you were to take even one of the band members off of this album, a big chunk of its sheer quality and mastery would be severely missed.

This album also brings together styles of music previously unseen on rock albums, and it also introduced staples that are still being used (and sometimes abused) in prog rock today. Jazz music is an obvious influence here, seen on the improvisation-heavy "Moonchild" and the jazz instrumentation McDonald brings to the table, and other things used include the pop song structure of "I Talk To The Wind," a little bit of blues infused into "Schizoid Man," and even baroque music with the epic flourishes used on McDonald's mellotron.

As for the real shining moments on the album, "21st Century Schizoid Man" is an instant classic that grabs your attention on the very first listen, what with its surprising, striking opening chords and the distorted vocals from Lake. Even music fans who aren't usually too keen on progressive rock can appreciate this one just for its intensity, especially for a rock song from 1969.

"The Court of the Crimson King" is another essential track from this album, including some of Sinfield's finest lyrical work with the band. Michael Giles is also an integral part of this song's brilliance. It is even stronger in the context of the album, because after the quiet, slightly meandering improvisation on "Moonchild," the listener is just hit with a rush of intensity, almost like a musical apocalypse to close the album off.

"Epitaph" is also one of the most successful tracks on the album for similar reasons as the final track. It is an emotional rollercoaster, improved by the musical chemistry on this track between Lake, Giles, and Fripp. The lyrics also expand on the political commentary of "Schizoid Man," making it a fitting track on the album.

Personally, some of my favorite moments come from "I Talk To The Wind," especially McDonald's final flute solo to end off the track. I also really like the fantasy imagery in the lyrics of "Moonchild."

As for weak moments on the album, the only one that is generally pointed out as a weak moment is the improvisation entitled "The Illusion" for the most of "Moonchild." Yes, it's no masterpiece, and it definitely isn't King Crimson's best when it comes to improv that we would later see in the mid-70s, but it is still musically interesting and works just fine in the context of the album, although it is the weakest track.

Overall, this album is a 5/5, and it still holds up today thanks to the fine production. Progressive rock and its many artists wouldn't nearly be as massive if it wasn't for the influence, innovation, and mastery of this classic. It is simply essential, and a must-hear for fans of prog and rock alike.

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Eclectic Prog bands/artists list

Bands/Artists Country
16 DEADLY IMPROVS United States
17F Switzerland
4/3 DE TRIO France
8 DAYS IN APRIL Germany
A.C.T Sweden
ABRETE GANDUL Chile
ABSOLUTE ELSEWHERE United Kingdom
ABSURDCUS Romania
ACADEMIE OF FARSIDE Indonesia
ACINTYA France
ADVENT United States
AFFINITY United Kingdom
AKO DOMA Slovakia
AKRITAS Greece
AKT Italy
JEAN-PIERRE ALARCEN France
ALBATROS Germany
ALCO FRISBASS France
ALEXL Brazil
ALGERNON United States
ALLOMERUS Australia
ALON United States
ALPHA RALPHA France
ALQUILBENCIL Spain
ALQUIN Netherlands
ALTABLANCA Argentina
ALTAIR Spain
ALTERNATIV QUARTET Romania
ALTERS Poland
MICHEL ALTMAYER France
AMPLEDEED United States
ANAKDOTA Israel
APERCO Israel
COSTE APETREA Sweden
APPLE BELLS Poland
ARBATEL Mexico
ARDO DOMBEC Germany
AREKNAMÉS Italy
ART AND ILLUSION Italy
ARTCANE France
PETER ASHBY United Kingdom
THE ASHQELON QUILT Israel
ASTRID PRÖLL Puerto Rico
ATHELSTONE Malta
ATLANTIDE France
AUDIENCE United Kingdom
AUDIO VISIONS United States
AUNT MARY Norway
AVE ROCK Argentina
AVIATOR United Kingdom
ÁVORA DI CARLLA Brazil
AXON-NEURON United States
BAD ALCHEMY United States
VLADIMIR BADIROV Uzbekistan
BAG France
DAVID BAGSBY United States
BAKU LLAMA United States
FRANCK BALESTRACCI France
BARBARO Hungary
BARRACUDA TRIANGLE Sweden
AL BASIM Iraq
BASTA! Italy
BATABEAT Canada
BEAR IS DRIVING United States
BEARDFISH Sweden
ADRIAN BELEW United States
SERGIO BENCHIMOL Brazil
IL BERLIONE Japan
MICHAEL BERNIER United States
BIRDS AND BUILDINGS United States
BLOQUE Spain
THE BOB LAZAR STORY New Zealand
BOOTCUT Sweden
EMMANUEL BOOZ France
BORDERLINE SYNDROME Greece
EDUARDO BORT Spain
BRAINSTATIK United States
VYTAS BRENNER Venezuela
BRIGHTEYE BRISON Sweden
BUBBLEMATH United States
BUBU Argentina
JEAN-LOUIS BUCCHI France
BUDKA SUFLERA Poland
ARNAUD BUKWALD France
C & K VOCAL Czech Republic
CABEZAS DE CERA Mexico
CALLE DEBAUCHE United States
CAMERA CHIARA Italy
NEIL CAMPBELL COLLECTIVE United Kingdom
CANGACEIRO Chile
JOSE CARBALLIDO Spain
CARPE DIEM France
CARPET Germany
CARTOON Brazil
CASTLE FUSION Italy
CATAPILLA United Kingdom
CENTENAIRE France
CHAMELEON United States
CICCADA Greece
CIRCLES END Norway
EL CIRCULO DE WILLIS Spain
CIRCUS Switzerland
CIRKUS United Kingdom
BARRY CLEVELAND United States
CLOUDS ON STRINGS United States
CMU United Kingdom
COLONEL CLAYPOOL'S BUCKET OF BERNIE BRAINS United States
CONSIDER THE SOURCE United States
THE COWBOYS FROM HELL Switzerland
CRIME IN CHOIR United States
CRÓ! Spain
THE CRYSTAL SUN United Kingdom
CULPEPER'S ORCHARD Denmark
CURVED AIR United Kingdom
CZAR United Kingdom
DAAL Italy
THE DAEDALUS SPIRIT ORCHESTRA France
DAGMÄHR Canada
DALTONIA Chile
DARK AETHER PROJECT United States
DAYS BETWEEN STATIONS United States
GUILLAUME DE LA PILIERE France
DEBOCO France
DIAGONAL United Kingdom
DICE Sweden
DIONYSOS Canada
DISCORDIA Finland
DISEN GAGE Russia
DISTINGUISHED PANEL OF EXPERTS Multi-National
DJAM KARET United States
JULIUS DOBOS Hungary
WILLIAM D. DRAKE United Kingdom
DREADNAUGHT United States
DREADNOUGHT United States
DRIFT United States
EARTH SIZE DIAMONDS United States
EAST OF EDEN United Kingdom
ECHOES France
EDENSONG United States
EFECTO Chile
EKSEPTION Netherlands
ELEKTRYK BESTIA United States
EMMETT ELVIN United Kingdom
EMERGENCY EXIT France
EMPATHI Thailand
EMPTY SPACE ORCHESTRA United States
EPIDERMIS Germany
ERE G Canada
ERIK BARON & D-ZAKORD France
ESPERANTO Multi-National
ESTHEMA United States
ET CETERA Canada
EVELINE'S DUST Italy
EXCLUSIVE RAJA France
EXPERIMENTAL Chile
EXPERIMENTAL QUINTET Romania
FAMILY United Kingdom
FANTASIA Finland
FETUS MAXIMUS Finland
OLIVIER FEUILLERAT France
FINNEUS GAUGE United States
FLASH United Kingdom
FLÄSKET BRINNER Sweden
FLIGHT United States
THE FLOCK United States
HUGO FLORES Portugal
FOND OF TIGERS Canada
FONDERIA Italy
FOXTROT Norway
FRAMUS 5 Czech Republic
FRATERNITY Australia
FRIENDSHIP TIME Sweden
ROBERT FRIPP United Kingdom
FROM.UZ Uzbekistan
FRUMPY Germany
FUN MACHINE United States
FUSIOON Spain
THE GAK OMEK United States
GALAAD Switzerland
GARDENIA Argentina
GARGAMEL Norway
GAYLORD United States
GECKO'S TEAR Italy
RON GEESIN United Kingdom
GENTLE GIANT United Kingdom
GESTALT Japan
JANE GETTER United States
GEVENDE Turkey
GEYSIR Germany
GLAZZ Spain
GLOBALYS Belgium
GNIDROLOG United Kingdom
GOAD Italy
GOMA Spain
GOOD NIGHTOWL United States
GÖSTA BERLINGS SAGA Sweden
JEAN-PHILIPPE GOUDE France
THE GOURISHANKAR Russia
SÉBASTIEN GRAMOND France
THE GRAND ASTORIA Russia
GRATTO United States
THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH United Kingdom
MAREK GRECHUTA Poland
GREYLYNG United States
GRIOT Portugal
GROOVECTOR Finland
THE GUARDIAN'S OFFICE Norway
GUERNICA Japan
TREY GUNN United States
GUNS AND BUTTER United States
GURUH GIPSY Indonesia
GUZZLEMUG United States
GYPSY United States
H7G Costa Rica
STEVE HACKETT United Kingdom
HAIKARA Finland
BRENDAN HAINS Australia
HALF PAST FOUR Canada
HAMADRYAD Canada
PETER HAMMILL United Kingdom
HANAGARIA Israel
HAPPY THE MAN United States
GAVIN HARRISON & 05RIC United Kingdom
STEVE HART United Kingdom
HEADSHEAR United States
HERD OF INSTINCT United States
HOBO Yugoslavia
HOBSON'S CHOICE United States
HOKR Czech Republic
HOME United Kingdom
HOMÍNIDO Chile
HOUSE OF USHER United States
HUNE Canada
ICED INK United States
ICHTHYANDER DAD'S ONLY DOLPHIN Ukraine
IKARUS Germany
ILLŔCHIME QUARTET Italy
ILLUSION United Kingdom
IN ABSTRACKTO Mexico
INFINIEN United States
INNER LIGHT ORCHESTRA Finland
INTERFACE Japan
INTERPOSE+ Japan
ISKANDER Germany
ISLAND Switzerland
IT United States
IT'S THE END Norway
IX Venezuela
IXT ADUX United States
JANOS VÁRGA PROJECT Hungary
JEAVESTONE Finland
JOY UNLIMITED Germany
JULIAN'S TREATMENT United Kingdom
JUNE CLEAVER AND THE STEAK KNIVES United States
KARMABLUE Italy
KATAYA Finland
KEOR France
KHARMINA BURANNA Peru
KIDS EAT CRAYONS Canada
KING CRIMSON United Kingdom
KLOTET Sweden
KOIAK Chile
KOLORS OF ZOUND Austria
KOMARA Multi-National
KORPUS 2 (Корпус 2) Russia
KRACQ Netherlands
KRAKEN IN THE MAELSTROM Italy
KROMLECH Mexico
KTU Multi-National
KTZAT ACHERET Israel
KULTIVATOR Sweden
KWADRAT Poland
KYTAJA Finland
LAPLACE Argentina
LALLE LARSSON Sweden
LASER PACE United States
THE LAZE United Kingdom
LAZULI France
LEMURYA France
LETHEAN Italy
BJORN J:SON LINDH Sweden
LIZARD Poland
LOBSTER NEWBERG United States
LOCOMOTIV GT Hungary
THE LONG HELLO United Kingdom
LOST KITE Sweden
LUARVIK LUARVIK Estonia
LUCIFER WAS Norway
MA BANLIEUE FLASQUE France
MACHIAVEL Belgium
MAD FELLAZ Italy
MAELSTROM Canada
MAGICAL PLANETS United States
MAHOGANY FROG Canada
MAJOR PARKINSON Norway
MAKAJODAMA Sweden
MAKKIWHIPDIES United States
MAMMUT Germany
MAN ON FIRE United States
MANFRED MANN'S EARTH BAND United Kingdom
MANNING United Kingdom
MAQAMA Israel
MARSUPILAMI United Kingdom
MASTERMIND United States
ME EL-MA Israel
THE MEDICINE CABINET United States
HAI MEIRZADH Israel
MEN OF LAKE Italy
METROGNOM Norway
MICHIRU Japan
JOHN MINER United States
MINI (TÖRÖK ÁDÁM & MINI) Hungary
MINIMUM VITAL France
MIRTHRANDIR United States
KIMIO MIZUTANI Japan
MOJO POJO Venezuela
MORAINE United States
EDUARDO MORENO Spain
MÖRGLBL France
STEVE MORSE BAND United States
MOSER WOODS United States
MOTORPSYCHO Norway
MOUTH Germany
MR. EUPHORIA United States
MR. HYDE Chile
DOMINIK MÜLLER Germany
MUSICA FICTA Israel
N.Y.X Italy
NAPRA Hungary
NARAJAMA Czech Republic
NARANJA MECANICA Cuba
NARR France
THE NATURAL MYSTIC Italy
NAU ALETHEIA Argentina
NECROMONKEY Sweden
NEMO France
NEMO France
NÉODYME Canada
NEOGRASS Norway
NEUTRONS United Kingdom
NEWCROSS United States
NICE BEAVER Netherlands
CZESŁAW NIEMEN Poland
NIL France
NOT A GOOD SIGN Italy
NOVA Finland
NURT Poland
OBLIVION SUN United States
OCTOHPERA Brazil
ODYSSEE Germany
RYO OKUMOTO Japan
THE OPEN WINDOW United States
OPERATION: MILKSNATCH United States
ORDER OF THE LIVING Finland
ORGIYA PRAVEDNIKOV Russia
ORIGINS United States
ORNE Finland
OS MUNDI Germany
THE OTHELLO SYNDROME United Kingdom
OUT OF THE BEARDSPACE United States
OZ URUGULU Switzerland
PALEY'S WATCH United Kingdom
PANDORA SNAIL Russia
HET PANDORRA ENSEMBLE Netherlands
PANGÉE Canada
PEANUT BRITTLE SATELLITE United States
THE PENGUIN CAFE ORCHESTRA United Kingdom
PENTWATER United States
THE PEROTIC THEATRE Germany
PHILHARMONIE France
PINGVINORKESTERN Sweden
BRUNO PITCH France
THE PITTS MINNEMANN PROJECT United States
PIXIE NINJA Norway
PLAMP Switzerland
PLAT DU JOUR France
PLATURNO Chile
POETICA IN SILENTIO Netherlands
LAURI PORRA Finland
VYACHESLAV POTAPOV Kazakhstan
JEAN-PAUL PRAT France
PRAXIS Mexico
PRAZSKY VYBER Czech Republic
PROCOSMIAN FANNYFIDDLERS Norway
PROFIL Germany
PROFUSION Italy
PROGRES 2 Czech Republic
PROMETHEAN Finland
PROTOFONIA Brazil
PSI VOJACI Czech Republic
PSICOTROPIA Spain
LA PURA REALIDAD Mexico
PURGE SOLENOID United States
QUAKER Argentina
QUARTETO 1111 Portugal
QUILT Canada
QUODIA United States
RACHEL'S BIRTHDAY Germany
SIMON RAILTON United Kingdom
RAW MATERIAL United Kingdom
REDD Argentina
THE REDZEN Italy
THE REFORMATION United States
EL RELOJ Argentina
REPLIKAS Turkey
RITRATTO DI UN MATTINO Italy
OMAR RODRIGUEZ-LOPEZ Puerto Rico
ROOTS OF CONSCIOUSNESS United States
LA ROSSA France
ROZMAINSKY & MIKHAYLOV PROJECT Russia
ANDRES RUIZ Argentina
THE RUNNING MAN United Kingdom
SACCHARINE TRUST United States
SAHARA Germany
SANHEDRIN Israel
SBB Poland
LUCA SCHERANI Italy
SCHIZOFRANTIK Germany
SCYTHE Germany
SEAMUS France
THE SEASON STANDARD Germany
SENOGUL Spain
SEVEN IMPALE Norway
SFILTROM Slovenia
SFINX Romania
SHAMBLEMATHS Norway
SHESHET Israel
SHINSEKAI Japan
SINATLIS TSELITSADI (THE LIGHT YEAR) Georgia
RIKARD SJÖBLOM Sweden
SKALDOWIE Poland
SKE Italy
JÓZEF SKRZEK Poland
SKY United Kingdom
SLEEPY PEOPLE United Kingdom
JULIE SLICK United States
MALCOLM SMITH United States
SIGMUND SNOPEK III United States
SOLAR WIND Israel
SOLUS3 United Kingdom
SOM NOSSO DE CADA DIA Brazil
SOMA PLANET Spain
SOPHISTREE Germany
SOUL ENEMA Israel
SPECIMEN13 Canada
SPEKTAKEL Germany
SPIROSFERA Italy
SPRING United Kingdom
SPROINGG Germany
SQUINTALOO Germany
STA IMA? Croatia
STAR PERIOD STAR United States
STELLA LEE JONES Japan
STICK MEN United States
JEREMY STORCH United States
STORM CORROSION Multi-National
STRINGPURÉE BAND Finland
JAMES SUDAKOW United States
SUMO ELEVATOR Israel
SUPERLUMINAL PACHYDERM United States
SYLBAT France
SYLVIA BLISS United States
SYNCAGE Italy
SYNKOPY Czech Republic
SYRIUS Hungary
TAAL France
TAGYERIT United States
THE TANGENT Multi-National
TÁNGER Argentina
TCP United States
TELIOF Israel
TELLAH Brazil
TERRENO BALDIO Brazil
THIEVES' KITCHEN United Kingdom
THORS HAMMER Denmark
TIME United Kingdom
TIN SCRIBBLE United States
TMN Switzerland
TOOTSCATS Russia
TOWNSCREAM Hungary
TRAFFIC United Kingdom
I TRENI ALL'ALBA Italy
TRIODE France
TRIPCYCLE Serbia
TROYA Germany
TU United States
TULLY Australia
UK United Kingdom
UMLÄUT Australia
THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD United States
URBAN NOMAD Canada
UTOPIA United States
VĆRKET Denmark
VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR United Kingdom
LAURENCE VANAY France
JEAN-CLAUDE VANNIER France
VELUDO Brazil
THE VIRIDIAN GROOVE Venezuela
VISITOR 2035 United Kingdom
VISITORS France
VISOKOSNOE LETO Russia
VITA NOVA Multi-National
VITAL DUO France
VITKASTE Finland
VOX NOSTRA France
VU METERS Italy
VULGAR UNICORN United Kingdom
VY Puerto Rico
WALPURGIS Germany
WEJAH Brazil
WHALEPHANT Russia
WLUD France
WOOLLY WOLSTENHOLME'S MAESTOSO United Kingdom
WOMEGA Belgium
THE WORM OUROBOROS Belarus
ALEX WROTEN United States
WRUPK UREI Estonia
XENOGRAFT Australia
XL Finland
YEAR ONE United States
YEZDA URFA United States
YGGDRASIL Faroe Islands
YOLE France
YONIN BAYASHI Japan
ZAPOTEC United States
ZECHS MARQUISE United States
ZEROESQUE United States
ZHONGYU United States
ZIP TANG United States
ZITA ENSEMBLE Italy
ZOMB France
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