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Eloy Fritsch - Solar Energy - from the album The Garden of Emotions

ELOY FRITSCH

 

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Submitted by ProgShine | 10/16/2013

ELOY FRITSCH - Electronic Keyboards, vocoder, syntheziser, computer and percussion. Solar Energy from the album The Garden of Emotions www.ef.mus.br Video montage from www.eyesontheskies.org , www.spacetelescope.org, www.astronomy2009.org, www.iau.org and from NASA/JPL at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov and the ESA/Hubble Space Telescope Information Center at http://www.spacetelescope.org The Garden of Emotions is the ninth album of Brazilian composer and keyboard player Eloy Fritsch. The new CD presents symphonic themes with choirs, analog and digital synths dominating. Some of the more solemn themes remind Isao Tomita. Lumine Solis is one of the best compositions and a choir-laden track. Solar Energy introduces a spacier atmosphere, with phasing pads and Berlin School sequences. This is pure EM and a very good one, with all sorts of really fat analog timbres. The Beyond the Mountains is a very cinematic and return to the Classically inspired structures, with an extra Ethnic elements. Electric Light is synthetic and even Kraftwerk-like, with insisting sequences, vocoders and a simple repeating melodic theme. Flutes, marimba sound and percussion welcome the coming of Savage before a melodic synth theme appears. Space Station is another foray into a purely synthetic world and you could also draw a comparison with Jarre''s Chrolologie. The Canyon of Hope finishes this album with flowing synths, symphonic textures and a reflective e-piano.

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