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ELECTRIC ORANGE

Krautrock • Germany


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Electric Orange picture
Electric Orange biography
Founded in Aachen, Germany in 1992 - Still active as of 2017

ELECTRIC ORANGE is a german (neo) krautrock band, mainly based on two masterminds Dirk Jan Müller (keys) and Dirk Bittner (guitar). Up to now both musicians had uncounted collaborations during their development and produced a huge amount of material on MC, Vinyl and CD-R. Besides some temporary flirts with house/techno elements the band actually delivers modern trippy krautrock adapted music, where Tom Rückwald handles the bass guitar since the year 2000.

The sound is decorated with cheerful electronic elements adapted from Tangerine Dream or Popol Vuh as well as provided with obsessional rhythms in the vein of Can or even Kraftwerk - all you might expect as significant for a contemporary krautrock sound.

The band offer an irresistible blend of hypnotic and tribal beats, soaring organ and synths, spacey guitars, recitatives, samples as well as analogue effects. Hereby they are keen on experimenting with all sorts of rare, obscure and vintage instruments. The song titles are often provided with funny and thought-provoking puns.

In 2009 ELECTRIC ORANGE decided to offer the first DVD release 'Live On The Psychedelic Network Festival 2007' featuring a complete show from 2007 in Würzburg as well as other recordings from a period between 2005 and 2008. And then at the beginning of 2010 the band released the new production 'Krautrock From Hell' where the line up saw a change according to the drums while Silvio Franoli was substituted by Georg Monheim.

Soon after second guitarist Josef Ahns left the band as well. They decided to carry on as a quartet furthermore and once a year from now on a new album was produced, one of them including live recordings from Roadburn Festival in 2012.

Dirk Jan Müller and Dirk Bittner are also regular members of the band SPACE INVADERS

Electric Orange official website

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ELECTRIC ORANGE Videos (YouTube and more)


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NettoNetto
Import
Sulatron
Audio CD$19.99
$32.66 (used)
MisophoniaMisophonia
Import
Studio Fleisch
Audio CD$19.99
Volume 10Volume 10
Import
Studio Fleisch
Audio CD$19.99
Time Machine 1992-2017Time Machine 1992-2017
Studio Fleisch
Audio CD$19.99
EOXXVEOXXV
Studio Fleisch
Audio CD$24.99
Netto by Electric Orange (2011-05-04)Netto by Electric Orange (2011-05-04)
Sulatron-Records
Audio CD$29.99
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ELECTRIC ORANGE discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

ELECTRIC ORANGE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.14 | 9 ratings
Electric Orange
1993
3.08 | 5 ratings
Orange Commutation
1995
3.04 | 6 ratings
Cyberdelic
1996
3.14 | 10 ratings
Abgelaufen!
2001
2.96 | 4 ratings
Tonbandreste
2001
3.08 | 18 ratings
Platte
2003
3.83 | 18 ratings
Fleischwerk
2005
3.99 | 36 ratings
Morbus
2007
3.78 | 67 ratings
Krautrock From Hell
2010
3.86 | 25 ratings
Netto
2011
3.19 | 12 ratings
XX
2012
4.06 | 123 ratings
Volume 10
2014
3.50 | 6 ratings
Netto Companion
2015
3.97 | 30 ratings
Misophonia
2016
3.53 | 5 ratings
EOXXV
2017

ELECTRIC ORANGE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Sessions Nebenan
2001
4.04 | 4 ratings
Unterwasser - Live 2002
2002
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live 2003
2004
0.00 | 0 ratings
Burg Herzberg 20.07.2007
2008
3.93 | 6 ratings
Live At Roadburn 2012
2013
4.00 | 3 ratings
Würzburg Cairo 2015
2017

ELECTRIC ORANGE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.67 | 3 ratings
Live At The Psychedelic Network Festival 2007
2009

ELECTRIC ORANGE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 2 ratings
Time Machine 1992-2017
2017

ELECTRIC ORANGE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

0.00 | 0 ratings
Hörtest
1996
0.00 | 0 ratings
Totales Brummen
2001
0.00 | 0 ratings
Electric Mutation
2001
0.00 | 0 ratings
Rote Sonne
2001
0.00 | 0 ratings
Cows Don't Dream At Night
2001
0.00 | 0 ratings
XX²
2014
4.00 | 2 ratings
Nein! HITS à Gogo - Golden Recordings
2015

ELECTRIC ORANGE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 EOXXV by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.53 | 5 ratings

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EOXXV
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars German band Electric Orange have been around in some form for twenty five years now, founded by Dirk Jan Müller, a multi- instrumentalist who primarily handles keyboards (and also recently started a well-received Berlin School-influenced prog- electronic side-project Cosmic Ground). Over their early years, alongside frequent contributor Dirk Bittner, the group was mostly occupied by guests and/or a rotating door of varied musicians, but a settled line-up of the band eventually found their calling in heavy Krautrock-flavoured ambient jams on their most recent works. To commemorate their anniversary, Dirk and the group have delivered three very different and worthy works this year, with the main focus being on `EOXXV', an expansive 134-minute set that falls somewhere between a new studio work and compilation (the recordings date from 2013 to January of this year), and for your money you get a lavish triple LP set or a double CD collection of superb Krautrock jams that frequently run to over twenty minutes in length each.

`Continuum' opens the album like many of the improvisations here and on recent Electric Orange works, blending long stretches of slowly unfolding ambient electronic drones, dusty distortion-laced guitar atmospheres and rumbling bass grumbles turned in multiple unpredictable directions by unrelenting drumming, the band expertly lifting in drama and retreating again over and over. Grumbling fluid bass ruminations and trippy guitar shimmers permeate `Under The Nun' around ethereal electronic canvasses, searing Mellotron bursts and slowly growing spacey swirling Hammond organ swells (that often call to mind the `Inside/Floating' psychedelic period of vintage German symphonic band Eloy). The sublime `Gnosis' (sadly only included on the CD edition) is spiced with the most subtle of delicate jazzy flavours among its glacial synth pools and lightly pattering drums that eventually take on a hypnotic tribal beat-like grasp, the piece taking a dangerous turn with some maddening fiddle slices and wavering electronic shivers in the finale.

There's an uncomfortable unease to the first half of `Misophonia IV's rumbling and brooding faraway ambient sound-collages that float and shimmer in unhurried hallucinogenic washes, with the piece soon moving in and out of tense drumming hypnotics, nightmarish psychedelics and stormy distortion melts. `Misophonia V' glides between dreamy mellow guitars, ethereal synth caresses and cacophonous flurries of wild drumming, the final crashing moments of `Faint' with its pounding mountain-sized drumbeat stomping down on everything in its path has to be heard to be believed, and album closer `Residuum' is equally a lulling space-music collage and darker ambient distortion drone with moments of blissful life- affirming touches.

`EOXXV' jumps back and forth between `kind of more of the same' as the last few studio releases, and serious contender for one of the albums of the year. While several tracks follow a similar pattern and the album is far too long, each individual piece is an outstanding Krautrock jam of heady sounds and exploratory colour all its own, and to have them compiled in the one place makes it a very attractive release. If you're a massive EO fan and not bothered by the fact that parts of the album mine similar ground to `Volume 10', `Misophonia' and `Würzburg Cairo 2015', then `EOXXV' will make a huge impression on you and make for yet another first-rate modern Krautrock work from one of the best heavy psych bands going around today.

Four and a half stars.

 Würzburg Cairo 2015 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Live, 2017
4.00 | 3 ratings

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Würzburg Cairo 2015
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars German band Electric Orange have been around in some form for twenty five years now, founded by Dirk Jan Müller, a multi-instrumentalist who primarily handles keyboards (and also recently started a well-received Berlin School-influenced prog-electronic side-project Cosmic Ground). Over their early years, alongside frequent contributor Dirk Bittner, the group was mostly occupied by guests and/or a rotating door of varied musicians, but a settled line-up of the band eventually found their calling in heavy Krautrock-flavoured ambient jams on their most recent works. To commemorate their anniversary, Dirk and the group have delivered three very different and worthy works this year, one of them being `Würzburg Cairo 2015', a live document that showcases their set of trippy, atmospheric and frequently minimalistic jams from the 8th Psychedelic Network Festival of two years ago.

Fifteen-minute opener `Behind The Wall Of Sheep' (yes, you read that right!) sets much of the template that several stretches of the performance cover - behind Georg Monheim's rumbling incessant drums, Dirk's keyboards lightly coat the background in the most subtle of ways with pristine electronic caresses, Tom Rückwald's bass grumbles with purpose and Dirk Bittner's squalling feedback-laced distorted guitars reverberate into infinity. Traces of the improvisation remind of the legendary early Pink Floyd live performances in their more howling moments, and the piece moves between noisier builds and serene come-downs like so many of the classic Krautrock works.

Over a plodding beat, the guitars of `Fluff' move between victorious dreaminess and fierce defiant contemplations, Dirk's bleeding keyboard violations chug in and out of stormy drum tantrums throughout `Perpetuum Mobiliar', and `A Tuna Sunrise' drifts with shimmering electric piano tendrils and shambling acoustic guitars before culminating in a blissful Mellotron lift. `Supptruppen' is eleven minutes of haunting and mysterious drowsy guitar splinters cutting through murky ambient drones, and `Auslauf' is a shorter Mellotron-flecked guitar maelstrom that wouldn't have sounded out of place on the early Tangerine Dream albums. `Ducktango' is an early A.M hours drifting darkly jazzy saunter with slithering thick bass and groaning trumpet cries, and `Samba Ohrleck' is an equally stormy and chilled psychedelic shimmer with maniacal spoken-word rantings.

Equal parts dreamlike wander and nightmarish intensity, the near seventeen-minute closer `Mischwesen' is a relentless percussion-driven masterclass of hypnotic power and carefully executed build. Slow to unfold, meandering bass ruminations, droning trumpet wafts and maddening incessant drumming build into a barely restrained storm, Dirk adding a thick layer of brooding electronic washes, ghostly Mellotron choirs and a touch of early Klaus Schulze to his frantically delirious synth soloing.

Any listeners who have witnessed the band grow into the dynamic and mesmerizing Krautrock band that they are today over their last few studio albums will greatly appreciate this comparable and superb live account. While perhaps the band might be overdue for a new live DVD/Bluray, their first since `Live at the Psychedelic Network Festival 2007' a decade ago, `Würzburg Cairo 2015' is available on both CD and a lavish double LP on Sunhair Records, and it makes for a very fine way to celebrate the first twenty-five years of the group - here's to the next quarter century!

Four stars.

 EOXXV by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.53 | 5 ratings

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EOXXV
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

3 stars Gosh, how time flies! Meanwhile we are noticing the band's 25th anniversary! In the light of this event they have decided to release a double CD (on Fleisch) respectively tripple LP (via Adansonia). A good reason for a short retrospective at first. Originally initiated more as an experimental solo project, keyboarder Dirk Jan Müller started in 1992 recording and releasing songs. The album 'Cyberdelic' (1996) then manifested the begin of a very fruitful collaboration with Dirk Bittner, and the progress towards a real band. Both will represent the stable and congenial core furthermore. Josef Ahns (guitar, flute) then would follow as a steady member for some years, until, while continuing with the highly acclaimed 'Morbus' album in 2007, Tom Rückwald (bass) decided to enter the crew.

Since 2008 the current line up will be completed due to Georg Monheim. Deep respect to the previous drummers, but with his unique percussion style he definitely managed to add a special note to the band's sound. Musically ELECTRIC ORANGE are standing for a modernized interpretation of the 'good old' krautrock spirit. While combining some main ingredients, which are classic space rock, tribal percussions, hypnotic rhythms as well as ambient progressive electronics. This based on a proper amount of improvisation and experimentalism by using a lot of exceptional instruments. Well, the murky front cover solely will come into effect actually regarding the vinyl version, I would say. Since 'Misophonia' at least relatively dark-coloured visuals are dominating, probably aimed at complementing with their somewhat doomy melancholic soundscapes.

Content-wise it appears that some leftovers from previous sessions are given, I assume. The first CD is comprised of three tracks, recorded early 2013, hence originally to be designed for 'Volume 10' most likely. Where hereby Gnosis solely appears on the compact disc version with Tom using an acoustic bass! Continuum is a really gripping affair, mirrors the global EO sound and spirit at its best. Groovy and floating parts are constantly alternating, you won't have any damn clue in which direction this is going to flow. Bass, drums, keyboard and guitar are swirling around with fantastic interaction. Second CD starts with two further 'Misophonia' partitions, recorded in 2016 where IV does not really meet my taste due to its depressive atmosphere overall. Additionally two excerpts appear, which are relatively new, recorded in January 2017 precisely defined.

Very convincing according to my taste. Faint and Residuum yet again are offering a wonderful meandering and spacey execution over the course of nearly 40 minutes. Provided with the option to really tune out for some time. The bass playing sounds rather different here. A lonely dog is barking towards the end, probably a mysterious sign pointing to the next album which will follow? 'EOXXV' is a considerable achievement, a good album comprised of extended and rather loose jams. Newbies shouldn't necessarily start with this one. Die-hard ELECTRIC ORANGE fans will get their money's worth though in any case, as the band once again confirms a very unique atmosphere throughout.

 Time Machine 1992-2017 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2017
4.00 | 2 ratings

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Time Machine 1992-2017
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars It's hard to believe that German band Electric Orange have been around in some form for twenty five years now, founded by Dirk Jan Müller, a multi-instrumentalist who primarily handles keyboards (and also recently started a well-received Berlin School-influenced prog-electronic side-project Cosmic Ground). Over their early years, alongside frequent contributor Dirk Bittner, the group was mostly occupied by guests and/or a rotating door of varied musicians, dropping albums (some even on the renowned Delerium Records label) that covered everything from psychedelic rock, retro-flavoured prog and even dance/trance/electronic pieces, and frequently with a wry sense of loopy humour! A settled line-up of the band eventually found their calling in heavy Krautrock-flavoured ambient jams on their most recent discs, and to commemorate their anniversary, Dirk and the group have delivered three very different and worthy works this year, one of them being `Time Machine 1992-2017', a schizophrenic and eclectic collection of rarities and unreleased exclusives - and make no mistake, this is hardly some mere throwaway compilation!

Dating from 2012, the clanging machine vibrations and scuzzy feedback-driven guitar strums over a rattling incessant drumbeat of opening jam `Psysomasyl' would easily fit on their recent albums, the piece growing brooding and intense as it progresses. Those who've only checked into the band on their recent dustier eastern-flavoured jams will likely fall off their camel when they hear the first curveball, `Bone And Rock', a groovy psych-rocker powered by grumbling bass and a hint of twanging Sixties surfie rock to the guitars, whirring organs and shimmying up-tempo vibes, and there's just a trace of delicious dirty danger to some deranged faraway spoken rantings! The infectious `Noila' from 2000 then embraces the Krautrock influences of the band, being a bouncy and buoyant Neu!/Can-esque jangling pop guitar groover.

But unexpected surprises await, as we turn the clock back to the mid-Nineties - `Six Fives' is an effortlessly cool and mellow chill-out with clicking trip-hop beats that might have more in common with Massive Attack, and despite incorporating Berlin School sequencer patterns, `Patient's Pop' is a vocal dub popper that calls to mind the more commercial The Orb moments, and it's likely to be a bit of a controversial moment here!

Shooting forward to 2004, `Vegetables' returns to trippy shimmering psychedelia and fuses it with tasty slow-burn bluesy and jazzy guitar jamming. The stunning near-ten minute `Life Evil', one of the more recent pieces here from 2013, is a drifting improvisation of glistening electronics and slowly unwinding dreamy distortion-laced guitar that lightly calls to mind the early `Alpha Centauri/Zeit/Atem' period of Tangerine Dream. 2004's `Shunguki' has relentless and lurching bottled-up programmed beats that almost take on a tribal flavour, flecked with the lightest of reggae touches and twitching electronics.

`Back From The Funny Farm' (from all the way back in 1993) is a deeply psychedelic and disorientating collage of Mellotron slivers, feverish organ bleeds and drowsy Pink Floyd-like rippling guitar tendrils, and the fifteen minute closer `Time Signals' returns to the very start of the Electric Orange story a year before that. More or less a solo piece from Dirk of reverberating drones, wild drumming crashes and ultimately serene humming synth washes in the early Krautrock and Tangerine Dream manner, it's like dry run for the sort of music he offers in his Cosmic Ground side-project these days.

Also throughout the disc at various points are six sprinkled short fragments of `Dirge', an ambient and cavernous drone improvisation from 1995, perhaps the first sign of the moody atmospheres the band would embrace more fully in their recent years.

There's no doubt that Electric Orange have had a big boost in status since the release of their defining musical statement - to date - in 2014 with `Volume 10', and there's plenty of moments on this compilation that will especially appeal to listeners of that recent period of the group, as well as fans of Dirk's own Cosmic Ground. The disc has multiple personalities, so perhaps it's best to just think of it as an awesome mix-tape, and you'll likely have a great time with this unpredictable, colourful and superb collection from this talented bunch!

Four stars.

 Volume 10 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2014
4.06 | 123 ratings

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Volume 10
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The output of psychedelic jam bands tends to be a bit of a mixed bag, and this remains the case for Krautrock- influenced units like Electric Orange. Many early Krautrock releases were produced on an improvisational basis, and the results were often as hit-and-miss as more modern jam band releases, but Volume 10 is a particular gem from the Electric Orange back catalogue, with a stripped-back production that really helps capture the atmosphere of the freewheeling experimentation of the early Krautrock era. The song titles are weird spoofs on Black Sabbath songs, and whilst there's not much that's specifically doom metal about the album it's heavy enough that it feels like something Sabbath might have produced had they dropped Ozzy and gone Krautrock.
 Würzburg Cairo 2015 by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Live, 2017
4.00 | 3 ratings

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Würzburg Cairo 2015
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars This is a live performance from the 8. Psychedelic Network Festival, recorded just at that time in 2015 when their new studio album 'Nein! HITS A Gogo' was ready to be released. A wondrous production by the way, longing back to the very early days in Germany, when open minded musicians and producers began to break the chains while aiming for some experimental and whacked out music stuff. Consequently two excerpts are presented by ELECTRIC ORANGE in Würzburg too, that figures. Overall the ten songs are catering for a very spacey atmosphere, predominantly caused by Dirk Jan Müller and his keyboard stuff as a matter of fact.

When speaking of songs, okay, you will notice the basics, but this are variations, or even interpretations moreover. They'll never ever do the same twice, when it comes to their musical output at least. So much the more when playing live. And this may be the primary occasion that ELECTRIC ORANGE evolved to my most reviewed band over the course. Well, not any excerpt from my favourite 'Krautrock From Hell' album amongst the collection, but there's definitely no reason to complain about the set list however. With at least four representatives 'Netto' is the winner of the competition here.

The gig intro shows Dirk Bittner having a weird, gloomy, spaced out piece of monologue in German language, backed by the other Dirk on synths. Then Behind The Wall Of Sheep and the following Fluff (now finally welcome to the show, Tom!) are confirming the main vibe of the performance. I mean a spacey mid tempo groove, based on varied, very precise and sometimes tribal percussion, garnered with guitar variants from wah wah to soaring space. Additionally synth, organ respectively mellotron patterns are perfectly complementing. Man, what a superb entree!

When implementing somewhat industrial mechanics the mysterious Perpetuum Mobiliar will lead them into authentic krautrock territories more and more. Due to A Tuna Sunrise they are sinking into a trippy mood again after that, soon gliding into the intriguing Supptruppen, perfect interaction guaranteed! While they are using a drum machine, organ and trumpet Drucktango and Samba Ohrleck are from the abovementioned album 'Nein! HITS A Gogo'. You're getting close to more jazzy stuff, reminding me at Staff Carpenborg And The Electric Corona somehow.

Hey, and it's the first time, what I know, that they are introducing the band members to the audience! Finally, the closing Mischwesen shows them on jamming paths again, including a mental downfall towards the end. A gripping flow! Dirk Bittner is leaving the electric guitar aside, solely concentrating on trumpet and additional percussion. I'm repeating myself with pleasure, this band is excellent, entertaining, highly emotional! What also applies to this album, which is available on double vinyl (Adansonia Records) and CD (Sunhair Music). Cover and booklet include some really colourful images from the concert.

 Misophonia by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.97 | 30 ratings

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Misophonia
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Aussie-Byrd-Brother
Special Collaborator Rock Progressivo Italiano Team

4 stars Offering in their twenty-five-plus year career everything from colourful retro-prog, electronica/dance and even psych-pop party blowouts (the cool stop-gap release `Nein! HITS à Gogo!' from 2015!), unpredictable German group Electric Orange delivered a masterwork in 2014 with their moody and atmospheric Neo-Krautrock stunner `Volume 10', and they're back two years later with another refinement of their sound, `Misophonia'. This time around, the instrumental band offer a heavily- improvised collection of eclectic sounds that moves through everything from ambient, Post-Rock, drone and psychedelic flavours, even some light New-Wave touches all woven to their lengthy Krautrock jams, with the band constantly displaying a masterful control of mood, build and atmosphere throughout.

Eighteen-minute opener `Organized Suffering' is constantly rhythmically driven, frequently racing with an up-tempo momentum by way of rippling psychedelic cascades, parched guitar clamour and hovering electronic drifts, with little traces here and there even calling to mind the Delerium Records-era of Porcupine Tree. Dirk Bittner's guitars slink with everything from a cool Eighties sleekness, bluesy bends and stuttering spasms, Tom Rückwald's heavy bass grumbles seductively, and the closing section hums warmly with toasty thick Hammond organ and congas. `Bottledrone' opens as a lulling ambient drone over fuzzy embracing guitar caresses that reminds of the Ash Ra Tempel, Ashra and Manuel Göttsching before catching fire with Dirk Jan Müller's bleeding vintage electronics unravelling over Georg Monheim's rising energetic drumming. 'Demented' is a percussion-driven piece over shimmering ambient washes and murkily grooving guitar strums, the loose New-Wave flavoured guitar-driven `Shattered' almost grooves in the manner of the `Beat-...Perfect Pair' King Crimson era, and `Opsis' glistens with chiming mandolin mystery.

The almost thirty minute title-piece `Misophonia' is spread out over three tracks at various intervals throughout the disc. The first piece opens as a dusty distorted drone that grows in relentless power from ringing bluesy guitar and heavy dreamy electronics, the second is a hazy rumbling interlude, but the third and final act is a full-blown seventeen-minute epic. This album closer starts as a howling and wavering throb that spontaneously explodes to life with rattling drums, roaring guitar snarls, seeping electronic bleeds and looping Tangerine Dream-like machine repetition. It's a masterclass in brooding intensity and spiky danger, with delicious little traces of that precious early Pink Floyd fragility emerging throughout.

Once again mastered by frequent EO collaborator and Grobschnitt's leader/drummer Eroc, `Misophonia' perhaps doesn't quite reach the defining atmospheric heights and carefully sustaining mood of `Volume Ten', but it absolutely presents a band still exploring, refusing to merely recreate the sounds of the past, and challenging both themselves and their listeners. Electric Orange successfully bring vintage Krautrock sounds rumbling into the modern age and fuses it with a range of other styles, and this intoxicating, slow-burn hypnotic album ranks amongst their best releases to date.

Four stars.

 Misophonia by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.97 | 30 ratings

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Misophonia
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Jazz-Rock / Fusion / Canterbury Team

4 stars Coming in at over 72 minutes long, Misophonia represents another monster of an album from Aachen's Krautrock/Kosmische Musik stallwarts, ELECTRIC ORANGE.

1. "Organized Suffering" (18:09) opens with rolling bass line, guitars, drums and high pitch drone revving up, taking about forty seconds to get into full gear. Then, at 2:16, everything shuts down for some synths and three "explosion" distorted guitar/bass strums spread out over about twenty seconds. Synths then take over the lead above drums and occasional distorted bass notes. Heavily treated, animal-like vocalizations pop in and out of the soundscape toward the end of the fifth minute. Then things quiet down again around 5:20. Militaristic drums slowly build from there with bass, vocalizations and synths continuing their play. Psychedelic lead guitar play is slowly, sparsely added into the drum-dominant mix. Things quiet down again around the eight minute mark with guitar, quiet drums, and slowly penetrating mid-pitch synth note working its way into the soundscape, into our minds. At 9:30 there is a subtle shift as rolling bass, synth chords and drums return. At the end of the eleventh minute guitar and synths start to do some interesting if occasional things but at this point this is really a drummer's show. In the thirteenth minute the bass and synths begin some new activity--both attracting more of the listener's attention--but the, just as quickly, everything drops out (again) as if to reset. Modulated synth (or organ?) goes freaky on us while simple drum and bass lines play modest support. The organ really begins to dominate (finally!) and the bass and drums capitulate to create the song's first melodically based groove. The key/chord change at 16:20 almost blows it, but then they get back into it. This sounds almost like a 1960s DOORS or PINK FLOYD jam. Not a great song as it never seems to really get off the ground nor does it truly establish any kind of 'hook' to engage and maintain our interest. (7/10)

2. "Bottledrone" (11:48) starts out as slowly and uneventfully as the opening song--totally synth-dominated--but really kicks in delightfully by the halfway point and remains full and interesting to the end. (9/10)

3. "Demented" (7:51) opens with some spacey Blade Runner-like synth noises before an Indian-like rhythm section jumps into the field at the thirty second mark. Now, this is Kosmisches Musik! The drummer is in an awesome groove in the low end while his cymbal activity is all creative and playful. Slow space synth movement is gradual and constant while heavily treated guitars and basses flit in and out of the soundscape. The synths remind me exactly of Tony Banks' synth play in the second half of GENESIS's "The Waiting Room." I love it! By the sixth minute the bass has actually committed to a steady rhythm track while the guitar and cymbals continue their free form contributions. The instrumentalists slowly recede to allow for a quiet end to the song. (8/10)

4. "Misophonia I" (8:58) opens with deep synth notes and low end bass play with a kind of metronomic, Native American-like low end drum beat. For the first three minutes I can definitely picture native American tribal dancers around the campfire--maybe readying themselves for war. The disturbing and discordant shift during and throughout the fourth minute leads to the establishment of a kind of groovy Buddha Lounge song at the four minute mark. Bass, drums and guitar riffs are all on fixed groove mode while the bouncy synth sounds like he's performing at an Ibiza all-night rave club. Horn-like sounds are layered and echoed during seventh minute to nice effect. This turns out to be the song's last real surprise or shift as things begin to slowly fade over the course of the next two minutes. Interesting song. I'm not sure of its intentions or reasons--nor am I certain if it really works. It is, however, unusual. (8/10)

5. "Shattered" (4:40) opens like a jazz song with some synths, bass, drums and wah-effected guitar riffing his chords over a cute hypnotic groove. The synth and drum play don't quite fit in, but this could almost fit in with some of the 1970s Black Exploitation film scores. The guitar and synth play feel at odds--as if they're in different universes--or, at least, different sound studios. Not a song that I care to hear again. (6/10)

6. "Misophonia II" (1:19) is a brief interlude which sounds as if it could almost be a classical piece that has been heavily, heavily treated and distorted in the psychedelic fashion. (8/10)

7. "Opsis" (5:25) has more of the feel and sound palette of the music from EO's 2014 masterpiece, Volume 10. The zither and horn sounds and calmer, more steady rock rhythm tracks are so nice to hear again! Beautiful if subtle melody! (9/10)

8. "Misophonia III" (17:36) I keep reading about the power and centrality of this song to this album and I have to say, I agree. It is one monster of a song, with an awesomely powerful opening from the keyboard master, Dirk Jan Müller. The development is slow but seemingly methodical, well-planned, and the keyboard drenched soundscape is joyfully drenched with Müller's strokes and washes. It's funny to enjoy so much the minimalist inputs from the band's other three members and just have the keys going solo over the course of the first six minutes. Once the rest of the band join in and establish their trepidous support, Dirk Jan continues to play around, but gradually his keys become more integrated into the weave, even seem to fade to background a bit--though there are the occasional really cool low end chord staccato hits. In the tenth minute, when things feel like they're starting to stagnate, Dirk Jan turns up the gas, puts on the horn synth, thrashes out a few heavy handed chords. Man! is he giving a great Berlin School keyboard exhibition! Volume levels all around amp up at the 12-minute mark, but then back off, leaving a little "Lucky Man" fade into the 13-minute mark. The bass, guitar and constant drum pattern keep it going, though, while DJ Müller again goes on his creative binging. More this, EO! I love it! (10/10)

While I enjoy all of the electronic space experimentation going on beneath the "lead" instruments by keyboard specialist Dirk Jan Müller, I find this album less cohesive and engaging than either Volume 10 or Morbus. I often find myself feeling as if the oceans of synth heaven going on beneath and the instrumental action above (or below) are disconnected--like sea and air--sea and mud.

Still, this is a nice 3.5 to four star album which I'm rating up for the monster epic "Misophonia III". A nice addition to any prog rock music collection.

 Misophonia by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.97 | 30 ratings

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Misophonia
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Einwahn

5 stars As someone who remembers the classic era albums as new releases, I firmly believe some of today's 'retro' bands rival their Old Masters in quality and, paradoxically, originality. And this new Krautrock release from the 21st century's leading practitioners of the sub-genre is a prime example. I haven't heard a better Krautrock album since the mid-1970's. It doesn't sound like any other Krautrock exemplar, but this is definitely, definitely Krautrock.

Nothing has impressed me more about Prog Archives than the 'hit' status accorded to Electric Orange's excellent 2014 release 'Volume 10'. This is testament to the open-minded cultural vision of fans on this site. The only thing that has held me back from reviewing 'Volume 10' is the fact that my own rating would drag down its consensus score (slightly). Well, with 'Misophonia', Electric Orange have taken an artistic quantum leap - and it has the 'Wow!' factor I look for in awarding 5 stars. Their best album since the brilliant 'Morbus' of 2007 - and musically the two albums hardly sound like the same band. As others have said, Electric Orange never stop progressing.

Krautrock is not everyone's cup of tea, and I would not pretend there is any special musical cleverness required to appreciate this off-the-wall sub-genre. Really it is more a question of one's psychological state. But if you enjoyed 'Volume 10', you should love 'Misophonia'. And these albums are all on Bandcamp to hear - there is no excuse to avoid checking them out.

Verdict: A 21st century Krautrock masterpiece.

 Misophonia by ELECTRIC ORANGE album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.97 | 30 ratings

BUY
Misophonia
Electric Orange Krautrock

Review by Rivertree
Special Collaborator PSIKE Team & Band Submissions

4 stars Before and after ... how about your mental constitution, eh? ELECTRIC ORANGE are taking us by surprise each time, obviously ... so what the hell were they thinking by choosing 'Misphonia' as the album title in this case? [Wait, Doctor Psych dissents, you should take note of the fact that this specific sound is not intended to make you sick or crazy, no, not at all!] So what? This is health-promoting? You are sure? Please tell me, who will stop this organized suffering once for all? Who is able to look at the cover sleeve for more than one minute? Where are those promised puns regarding the track titles? ...

... you might get an answer for each particular question anytime soon, lucky you, but meanwhile two new others will come up. Welcome to the ELECTRIC ORANGE club! I mean, I'm wishing you well when it comes to (mental) health care on this occasion. Well, all right, why bother too much. I'll better slip into my (age) demented role ... taking the headphones instead, align myself for the voyage and stop puzzling about the direction mother earth is rotating afterwards. By the way, recently they were on a vintage trip slipping into some spaced-out dance music with Bossa Nova leanings, and the swinging Shattered de facto sounds like a leftover or deliberated transition.

But now reaching for something computable eventually ... never change a winning team! ... the band's line up remains stable since 2010. A reliable constant, such as a proven spaceship crew, which makes you feel safe about coming back to earth, always. What strikes here in any case is the strong and multi-faceted presence of Dirk Jan Müller's keyboard tools, be it the Tangerine Dream alike spheric patterns, farfisa and hammond drenched moments or those eerie synth outings. Maybe this can be called the band's all-embracing element, not in the meaning of something oppressive of course.

On the contrary, as Dirk Bittner, traditionally rather focussed on guitar and percussion, digs up more and more other instruments with each album. For example the trumpet decorating the title track and especially due to the use of a zither on the beautiful indo/raga styled Opsis. In addition Georg Monheim's fascinating drum playing is to notice, somewhat contradictive, while hypnotic and tribal either, but definitely varied during the whole course. Even bass player Tom Rückwald, often acting more restrained by nature in the past, has his flipped out moments.

'Misophonia' appears as an uncommon, unusual, magical affair. Can't believe if this was something coming impromptu. What still stays is the formidable challenge when trying to describe their music. ELECTRIC ORANGE always avoid trodden paths, no repetition please, are on a further expedition here. Especially when starting with the second vinyl they are offering new facets regarding their experimental approach, but seemingly never ever will loose contact to their (krautrock) base. Another must-have. Already waiting for the next bottledrone event.

Thanks to Rivertree for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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